Introduce yourself, tell us who you are and why you chose FreeBSD

Mjölnir

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We welcome any slang from Pidgin English to Oxford, indeed, don't we? Some members use an online translating service & from my experience these work sufficiently well. I have even seen some spanish speaking members offering to translate when someone was having trouble to find the right terms in English. This forum is about FreeBSD & not about Oxford English.
 

SirDice

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We welcome any slang from Pidgin English to Oxford, indeed, don't we?
As long as you don't use rude or offensive words, yes. I often edit posts though, to make them more presentable (we like to keep the formatting the same for everything), correct bad spelling, capitalization, or obvious grammar errors. Don't take that personally, we're well aware not everybody is fluent in English. Heck, I probably make some typical "Dunglish" mistakes too.
 

vigole

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Probably, we will never know, how many people are coming:
1. From Windows and/or Linux.
2. To FreeBSD, and/or (OpenBSD|NetBSD) <--/--> FreeBSD.
But recently, we've had many posts here. It sounds promising.
 

Zirias

Daemon

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I think (well, unfortunately) it's more likely to come from Linux than from Windows. Just because Linux is a lot more popular. So, if you have a PC and don't like that thing that was preinstalled, you'll try Linux. Only if you're not completely satisfied, you'll look for other operating systems.

But hey, maybe I'm wrong :eek:
 

Mjölnir

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As long as you don't use rude or offensive words, yes. I often edit posts though, to make them more presentable (we like to keep the formatting the same for everything), correct bad spelling, capitalization, or obvious grammar errors. Don't take that personally, we're well aware not everybody is fluent in English. Heck, I probably make some typical "Dunglish" mistakes too.
If you edited my posts, you did it so good that I did not even recognize it... :) (except for one, very early, I know you added or changed some formatting).
 

dbdemon

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Greetings, fellow daemons!

I'm a very (very!) recent convert. So recent in fact that I don't really have a proper FreeBSD installation yet, just a VirtualBox VM so far. I'm considering installing it on a Raspberry Pi next.

I've been (and still am) a Linux user for more than two decades, although I did come across some Unix computers in university. I've used mostly "safe" Linux distros such as Redhat, Fedora, CentOS, Ubuntu, Debian, OpenSuse. I like these because they tend to be reliable and have big communities.

I think my journey to FreeBSD started with Mac OS envy, recently re-ignited when hearing about the Hello OS. This has morphed into Unix envy and curiosity. And/or I became radicalised while watching FreeBSD YouTube videos! I really enjoy learning about Unix history, the FreeBSD philosophy so on. The FreeBSD handbooks are my Holy Books. I won't bother you with any silly questions until I have read The Handbook!

I work as a database engineer, mostly using MariaDB. I used to be a software engineer, and I still write a good bit of code besides SQL, mostly Python and some bash script.

I'm somewhat into retro home computers such as the Commodore 64, so I hope to find some good emulators for FreeBSD at some point.
 

aw16

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Hi everyone.

I work full-time as a software engineer (specializing in Scala). I have been on quite a journey to disintermediate all the major cloud/groupware providers from my personal system, and am pretty happy running Nextcloud and various apps in its ecosystem. This is my main use case for server.

Before this year, my infrastructure was all docker/docker-compose. The appeal of docker for sysadmining is that there are thousands of people who make premade container images for everything I want to use, so its literally just a matter of setting a few env variables on the image and off you go. No need to worry about what's in the image, or even what the underlying OS is up to, really.

After a few months of uptime, the containers would start to freeze in weird ways. I took it as a sign that I didn't understand my stack deeply enough. I had been thinking for a while that I needed to commit to a specific Linux distro and go in depth with it, since that would be a precondition for going deep. Funnily enough the "best distro" turned out to be no distro at all, and I committed to learning FreeBSD after being convinced that if offered sensible coherence and after being convinced Linux was giving in to corporatization.

Now I am fully switched to FreeBSD. The handbook is amazing, and through the setup process I finally feel like I have a grip on basic cybersecurity. Coming up next I plan to continue in that vein and learn how to do intrusion detection and audting.
 

dsagra

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Hello everyone!

I work as systems engineer maintaining the CDN and reverse proxy fleet at my current company; mostly working on automation with Python, Go, Terraform, CFN, Github, Docker, Cloud computing and all the things we DevOps love :)

As many other users, I followed a similar path, starting with Windows in late 90s when I still was a teenager, then moved to Linux in early 2000's (Mandrake and Fedora first and then Debian), then completely switched to FreeBSD at home about 4 years ago.

That was not my first interaction with BSD as I was introduced to FreeBSD during my Operating Systems course at University, I think it was FreeBSD 4.x version: I really loved the stronger separation between "base system" and user space, which is something you won't find on GNU/Linux and the documentation, very clear and to the point; but I didn't really have many opportunities to use it either at work or home.

Now that I decided to try and use it on my NAS/router and one HTPC at home, I would not go back and even managed to submit a few ports to the tree: hopefully I'll stick to FreeBSD for a bit longer!
 

kpedersen

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As long as you don't use rude or offensive words, yes. I often edit posts though, to make them more presentable (we like to keep the formatting the same for everything), correct bad spelling, capitalization, or obvious grammar errors.
I can often get a post through without your editing. Back in the DutchDaemon days, I didn't stand a chance! ;)
 

SirDice

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I can often get a post through without your editing.
It's sometimes akin to trying to drink from a firehose. I much rather spend my time actually answering questions then editing. So I do let some things slide every now and then. As long as it looks somewhat presentable. Some new users often post the most horrid eyesores. Screaming colors, different fonts, several different font sizes, it's like they purposely try to use every bbcode that's available.
 

fcorbelli

Member

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Regarding the language, I can quote an anecdote.
After giving a very long and complex speech to a 100% Londoner, miserably trying my best Queen accent (no r, we are briton!), I looked at him fearfully, saying (it's customary in the UK to apologize for anything) I'm sorry for my bad English.
He gave me a big smile, and replied: it's a thousand times better than my Italian.
We became friends, and now we write to each other ... in Russian.

As for me, the main problem is the Korean smartphone with a Chinese smart keyboard, setted with Cyrillic alphabet and Italian prediction, which does not like the technical English terms very much.
No way.
Easier with a normal PC
 

fcorbelli

Member

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Regarding FreeBSD I have been using it since Sun workstations went out of service, and so the Solaris OS.
I started with CP/M on Commodore 128D, going through Amiga, Alpha AXP, Xenix, OS/2, an operating system written by me similar to a rudimentary Linux (at the time of the University), until today.
Essentially I want zfs
 

mintspider

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Computing history goes back to 1983 with the Oric-1 & Oric Atmos when I was 16.
Also used: Dragon 32, Amstrad PCW8512, Enterprise 128, Amiga 1200, amongst others.
First time online was February 1997 using an AST PC running Windows 95 purchased from Comet, where I worked in Aberdeen, Scotland.
Met my wife Arianna online in September 1997 in a Christian IRC channel. Moved to Kentucky in May 1999. Married in Paris (Kentucky) in June 1999.

In my 21 years in the US, for the first 9 years I ran Windows 98 to XP, then discovered Linux about 12 years ago.
Started off with Knoppix live-CD as many did, but started testing other distros. Settled on Linux Mint 6 Felicia and ran that distro until 18 Sarah.
Discovered Solus in November 2016 and have been running that rolling distro ever since. Main PC (System76 Thelio) runs Budgie DE, but I also test Plasma on a Dell 755.

On my 2 Alienware M15x laptops, Max & Erma, I am running:
Max: PCLinuxOS Trinity
Erma: FreeBSD 13.0 RC5

Relatively new to FreeBSD, but have tested a few times. Recently decided to keep FreeBSD permanently on one of the laptops.
Really enjoying learning FreeBSD from scratch, mostly on the console.

So, here I am, and look forward to interacting with y'all.
 

Fuzzbox

New Member

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Messages: 3

Hi,

François, physician, France.

GNU/Linux user since 1999. Desktop usage, mainly.

I've seen snap, flat, pulse, avahi, wayland... come.
I've seen text logs, sysVinit, ifconfig, dnsmasq... go.

They won't have my /boot and my $HOME.

My Thinkpad is running FreeBSD for some weeks now.
It's under control again and feels like home.

Cheers to FreeBSD developers !
 

bobmc

New Member

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Who's new to FreeBSD? Did you migrate from another OS and what was your reason?
I have been using Linux since it was Slackware with a bunch of CDs. But I am interested in contributing to free software and the distros are already good and don't need my help.

I have already admired UNIX and was once an admin of SunOS 4.

So FreeBSD looks like the best one of the BSDs
 

kpedersen

Daemon

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But I am interested in contributing to free software and the distros are already good and don't need my help.
Linux distros are a fragmented mess. Are you sure you can't find something broken in them?

They need as much help as they can get ;)
 
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