Introduce yourself, tell us who you are and why you chose FreeBSD

Zirias

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 218
Messages: 602

Right now, my eventual home-server computer is installing FreeBSD, and once I've figured out the OS on there, I'll deploy it on my main desktop and laptop, it being the only OS on my laptop, probably.
With this plan (and if your server is powerful enough), I recommend you have a look at ports-mgmt/poudriere to build your own package repository. Advantage: Build ports with the build-time options YOU like, but do it only on one machine and just install the binaries anywhere. Drawback: Building takes quite some resources :)
 

Sevendogsbsd

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 248
Messages: 527

I find this hard to imagine. What was not working with NetBSD's networking stack? Why did you consider OpenBSD to be slow?
I am not the OP of this post but I too found openbsd to be terribly slow. I mean screen redraws were painful. I am assuming because I am running 4k video hardware but someone else mentioned that openbsd's strong suite was not its speed. I also found the openbsd installer to be terrible. FreeBSD has an awesome installer IMHO. No speed issues for me on FreeBSD - lighting fast.
 

cwARSw6

New Member


Messages: 4

Greetings,
I've been involved with computers since college in 1971. Fortran IV and assembly language on a Burroughs (model ??) using IBM keypunch w/cards, all output to fan-fold. Quite laborious relative to today's standards. Introduced to Unix in mid 70's on PDP-11 machines where I did some Admin and programming in shell and C. Sys/Admin, DBA from 80's thru 2010 on SunOS 3.something thru Solaris 10, Informix, Oracle RDBMS (7 thru 10). Also did Java EE dynamic web application development with Oracle SQL/PLSQL and NetBeans, Eclipse.

I'm in the process of switching 5 home built boxes from MS Win10 and Linux to FreeBSD. No need for a bloat-box loaded with a bunch of stuffing I'll never use on a machine I'm not totally in control of (ala MSWIN).
What I like about FreeBSD: ease of installation (20 minutes?), superior documentation, information resources (this well moderated forum for example), plus I'm in control of what I want on my machine and when I want to update it. There are many other plusses in its design and maintenance philosophy. I actually tried FreeBSD when it was first offered on CD-ROM several years ago and even went to FreeBSD Lite (whatever did they take out of it?). Eventually I was runing Solaris 10 at home so, I lost interest in my BSD box. Twenty some years later(?) and I'm back to FreeBSD.

I've been happily retired since the end of 2010 and spend much of my time wandering in the wilderness, hiking and mountain climing, carrying a portable home-built ham radio. Not much time spent on a computer any more. My computing needs are pretty simple: OS, wm (I chose xfce) and a handfull of applications (postgres, google-earth, firefox, thunderbird, stellarium, trusted-qsl, eclipse, gimp and open-office).
 

arseniogut

New Member

Reaction score: 3
Messages: 4

I'm a telecommunication student and semi-retired video effects artist. I had a particularly bad semester and went home to rejuvenate. In that time, I've taken to exploring imperative programming and basic system administration, as well as reading the literature on the history of modern computing.

I look forward to learning more about FreeBSD as a serious operating system and engaging with the community in the meantime!
 

CraigHB

Active Member

Reaction score: 45
Messages: 189

What I like about FreeBSD: ease of installation (20 minutes?), superior documentation, information resources (this well moderated forum for example), plus I'm in control of what I want on my machine and when I want to update it. There are many other plusses in its design and maintenance philosophy. I actually tried FreeBSD when it was first offered on CD-ROM several years ago and even went to FreeBSD Lite (whatever did they take out of it?). Eventually I was runing Solaris 10 at home so, I lost interest in my BSD box. Twenty some years later(?) and I'm back to FreeBSD
Pretty much a "me to" post, but probably okay in an intro thread. I'm about the same age as you with similar experience. I did Fortran on punch cards as an introduction to programming.

But yeah, it's the philosophy of design and organization of the system that really turns me on to FreeBSD. Wish I could go back and start with the FreeBSD CD instead of the Slackware one out of a big stack of of Walnut Creek CDs I picked up at a mid 1990's convention.

Back in the 90's FreeBSD was pretty obscure, not that Linux wasn't, but I gravitated toward Linux initially. It just had a lot more happening at the time. Didn't get around to trying FreeBSD again until a few years ago. Wish I had started with it because at this point I like it by far better than any other operating system.
 

drhowarddrfine

Son of Beastie

Reaction score: 1,217
Messages: 3,235

cwARSw6

I'm going to bet you use CW on the Amateur Radio Service and your call sign is W6... out there in California.
73s from WA0...
 

blackdog

Active Member

Reaction score: 9
Messages: 101

I'm a happy Windows 7 user till someday it asked me to activate it, the screen goes all black. I was trapped to download an adware bundled tool advertised it as could reset trial for both Windows and Office (I don't use Office and only use the machine for waterfox web surfing so I don't want to buy license from M$ and I know permanently crack it is plain wrong so I go with the middle way, reset trial). It turned out to be my biggest mistake. After spending hours fighting the adware via Task Manager, end process and end process tree it's still reappears. So I knew I can no longer use Windows 7 for free. I've to buy Windows 10 license and reinstall or cheaper, go with Linux. I choose the cheaper way, I installed MX Linux and I loved it (MX Linux happy user since MX 16, now it's MX 18.3).

I started to seek for an alternative OS when I found I'm dependent on the distribution/Linux so much. It's very good but I want to find an alternative OS could run the same user space programs as Linux but not Linux. And I found FreeBSD to be the most close. I also admit I tend to customize the system to match the UI/UX of MX Linux and make it feels like I'm running on Linux. The first thing I do is install bash and ln -s /usr/local/bin/bash /bin/bash to let all my scripts begin with #!/bin/bash to work happily. I don't care about ports system (I only use binary packages) and unwilling to learn more about FreeBSD unless something forced me to do so. The UI/UX almost the same and I could enjoy both the original MX Linux and my own ... MX BSD ;)
 

blackdog

Active Member

Reaction score: 9
Messages: 101

Paranoid? I'm used to do the same with Windows, seeking an alternative OS could run Windows apps but not Windows. Fearing a day if I'm so dependent on it, it stopped to work as I expected or introducing breaking changes, or... started to charge me for money? But ReactOS is nowhere as good FreeBSD. As long as the apps compile on FreeBSD and behave the same as on Linux I'm fine. After all it's all open source. If something provided as Linux binary only I will consult the Linux compat layer. If it just not run I just forgot it. The only Linux-only software I'm using is the SoftMaker FreeOffice.

p/s: And sorry if your brain explode when reading my post. You're talking with a non-English speaking guy has some serious mental problems. Try to parse it. My usage of English tenses is a mess and I acknowledge it.
 

CraigHB

Active Member

Reaction score: 45
Messages: 189

I think I get it, English not too bad.

I understand where you're coming from, FreeBSD does have a really nice Linux emulator, but keep in mind most apps can be grabbed from the FreeBSD repository as binary packages or compiled from the ports collection to run native in FreeBSD. A lot of them are the same apps you see for Linux, just ported over to FreeBSD.
 

kpedersen

Daemon

Reaction score: 535
Messages: 1,438

I'm a happy Windows 7 user till someday it asked me to activate it, the screen goes all black.
Possibly off-topic but do you own a Windows license? If you do then it is perfectly legal (in the UK) to use an activation tool such as a KMS server (or even an emulator) to activate your Windows install offline.

If this is something that might interest you but you cannot find a copy of the tool, then send me a PM.
 

CraigHB

Active Member

Reaction score: 45
Messages: 189

Yes OT, but Win10 is much more liberal with licensing restrictions, it won't become unusable if not activated, probably the only real benefit of the "Windows as a Service" business model.
 

arseniogut

New Member

Reaction score: 3
Messages: 4

p/s: And sorry if your brain explode when reading my post. You're talking with a non-English speaking guy has some serious mental problems. Try to parse it. My usage of English tenses is a mess and I acknowledge it.
No worries!

I'm more paranoid than a conspiracy theorist, but GNU/Linux isn't going away anytime soon. If you don't have any FreeBSD-specific needs, why not use a BSD-style system like Slackware?
 

blackdog

Active Member

Reaction score: 9
Messages: 101

No worries!

I'm more paranoid than a conspiracy theorist, but GNU/Linux isn't going away anytime soon. If you don't have any FreeBSD-specific needs, why not use a BSD-style system like Slackware?
Because I don't have to skills needed to do so. I love binary packages and apt very much. Luckily, FreeBSD has pkg ;)
 

Trihexagonal

Daemon

Reaction score: 878
Messages: 1,509

Because I don't have to skills needed to do so. I love binary packages and apt very much. Luckily, FreeBSD has pkg ;)
But you can develop those skills. :)

I taught myself to use ports when I started now that's all I use. It not only gave me valuable command line time when I was new to FreeBSD but I learned how to fix build problems if they arose.

I love to use ports-mgmt/portmaster and always use it. It can streamline and make things a lot easier on you once you get the hang of it.
 

~Luna

New Member


Messages: 4

Hi all!

Since this will probably a place where I will be spending some time in the future, a short introduction is not misplaced ;-).

I work daily with privacy and security related stuff at a large National Research and Education Network. Primarily the security and privacy of education related tools/products/projects, but also a large federated open source privacy focused VPN service/project. I am quite familiar with Linux (mostly Debian, CentOS/RHEL, Alpine) but notice that I keep liking it less and less as time progresses. It keeps getting more abstractions that make the system less transparent for me (think of stuff like systemd). I am not a die-hard technical person, so I try to keep things simple enough that I can understand it. Also it seems no one can dodge Docker, but I'm very sceptical about its security model. Both of these combined made me realise that it was time for a change in the tools I use and provide to others.

I tried some more Linux distros (Arch, Slack and stuff) and OpenBSD and HardenedBSD, but must say that I'm really charmed with the zfs/jail combination. FreeBSD seems like the logical choice. I tried FreeBSD and HardenedBSD in the past, but was turned off because of the lack of pre-compiled packages. But since there is pkg now, that is a problem of the past for most of my use-cases. Also I already use FreeNAS for many years so zfs wasn't new for me.

Well long story short: I'm going to spend some time on FreeBSD to get myself familiar with it and when comfortable enough will probably migrate systems and services to it in production. In the meantime I hope some people will be able to answer some (probably also stupid/basic) questions I have during this process :).
 
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