FreeBSD releases

Hi!
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Why?
What happened with my FreeBSD?
Tell me it's temporary.
Or is it a problem that can't be fixed.
 

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Or maybe it's a problem with the FreeBSD web server.
Certainly not. Although I have no idea what's the point of these subdirs, they are referring to releases that have been EOL for quite a while. 12.3 is EOL as well, but this subdir is still there.
 
EOL does not mean to close access to pkg.
I can't immediately upgrade from php5.6 to php7.4 and from mysql5.6 to mysql8.0. This is bad policy. I want to install the version I need and I install it. There is no such restriction on Debian.
 
Upgrade your OS. 🤷‍♂️

EOL means EOL. You can't really expect resources wasted to build packages specifically for EOL versions. Access to "pkg" isn't "closed" either, the ABI is the same, so you can still upgrade, but of course, there's some risk newer packages will use something in 12.4 that wasn't there yet in older versions.

Just upgrade your OS, it doesn't hurt.
 
EOL does not mean to close access to pkg.
I can't immediately upgrade from php5.6 to php7.4 and from mysql5.6 to mysql8.0. This is bad policy. I want to install the version I need and I install it. There is no such restriction on Debian.

PHP7.4 is also EOL and no longer available
 
I can't understand why you are forcing me to upgrade. It's actually my choice
It is. And it's our choice not to waste valuable resources trying to build packages for EOL versions. You are always free to build yourself if you want.

And just to make it clear, we're obviously talking about a minor upgrade here (12.x -> 12.4). This means NO breaking changes, SAME ABI ... so just do it. It's just as simple as any patchlevel upgrade. There's no risk attached.

That said, it's about time to upgrade to some 13.x version as 12.x gets closer to final EOL. Major upgrades can indeed have breaking changes. But after 5 years, I guess you can do that work. I follow FreeBSD since 10.x and never had any issues even with major upgrades.
 
EOL does not mean to close access to pkg.
I can't immediately upgrade from php5.6 to php7.4 and from mysql5.6 to mysql8.0. This is bad policy. I want to install the version I need and I install it. There is no such restriction on Debian.
There is, actually. Debian stops maintaining old stuff after awhile, as well, and they do remove access to old stuff. Just take a look here, their policy is comparable to FreeBSD's... Why do you think Debian was able to stick around for about as long as FreeBSD?
 
Since FreeBSD moved away from traditional mirrors and towards pkg-ng servers, they don't really have a focus on archiving anymore. Some solutions:
  1. Archive your own offline packages; starting *now*. (and hopefully share them with others in future years).
  2. Build up the packages from the old ports snapshot included on your older DVD. (expect some minor breakage as upstream projects move their source code around).
  3. Upgrade. For things that you can't upgrade, run within a Jail. But upgrade the rest.
 
I can't understand why you are forcing me to upgrade. It's actually my choice
Nobody is forcing you, it is only matter of finding somebody who would be willing to support you or your configuration, which has been declared unsupported by several sources (FreeBSD community, PHP community, whatever ancient version software you may be running community) . You can not force anybody, you know :)
 
I have to admit that this has bitten me also some times when I forgot to update, but this was obviously my fault. With debian you still have the possibility to install an old, unsupported version because they keep those old packages around on the archive mirror, which indeed is nice if you prefer gradual upgrades instead of more or less starting from scratch.
 
With debian you still have the possibility to install an old, unsupported version because they keep those old packages around on the archive mirror, which indeed is nice if you prefer gradual upgrades instead of more or less starting from scratch.
AFAIK, all Debian does is keep around the "old-stable" repository for a while. Of course, it isn't supported, it doesn't receive any updates, it's just there (until it's deleted).

I'm not really sure whether this is doing anyone a favor. It reduces the immediate pain for people who didn't upgrade in time. But the price is, they're running unsupported (and, most likely in parts vulnerable) software. The pain of some successful exploit executed on your production server will be much worse than the pain of not being able to install any package unless you upgrade your base system. 🤷‍♂️
 
Not sure why you put that in quotes? It's a fix indeed. 12.0 was released in December 2018. The expected lifetime for any stable branch (aka, major version) is 5 years. 🤷‍♂️

It was specified as a fix in the commit, so it must have been wrong for 4 years, is all.
 
I can't understand why you are forcing me to upgrade. It's actually my choice
When you rely on free software, you don't get to choose how the people who make the software support you.

I can't immediately upgrade from php5.6 to php7.4 and from mysql5.6 to mysql8.0.
This is a real big pain, I know, but you gotta do it now before it becomes an even larger pain. Move to MariaDB instead of mysql8, tho.

If this is a serious issue for you, then you're going to have to build a release from scratch, probably? It's probably a better use of your time to do an emergency port of your software.
 
It is. And it's our choice not to waste valuable resources trying to build packages for EOL versions. You are always free to build yourself if you want.

And just to make it clear, we're obviously talking about a minor upgrade here (12.x -> 12.4). This means NO breaking changes, SAME ABI ... so just do it. It's just as simple as any patchlevel upgrade. There's no risk attached.

That said, it's about time to upgrade to some 13.x version as 12.x gets closer to final EOL. Major upgrades can indeed have breaking changes. But after 5 years, I guess you can do that work. I follow FreeBSD since 10.x and never had any issues even with major upgrades.
You shoot yourself in the foot.
You will see soon everyone will refuse FreeBSD.
How it happened to centos
and don't tell me that сentos is alive.
 
Hasn't this question in one form or another been asked and answered multiple times on this forum with the same conclusions by the questioner, roughly "FreeBSD should keep package repos for every version because I don't want to upgrade and BTW FreeBSD is dead/dying?"

Just my opinions.
 
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