Your system's proportions

Argentum

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 298
Messages: 623

Hi, I am wondering how big are the FreeBSD systems you are using? Would you care to share your storage size, memory, network bandwidth, number of file systems?
Let me kick it off with two of my boxes:
Server:
Code:
~> zpool list
NAME    SIZE  ALLOC   FREE  CKPOINT  EXPANDSZ   FRAG    CAP  DEDUP  HEALTH  ALTROOT
zroot  36.2T  1.83T  34.4T        -         -     6%     5%  1.00x  ONLINE  -

Code:
~> sysctl hw.model hw.machine hw.ncpu
hw.model: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1270 v3 @ 3.50GHz
hw.machine: amd64
hw.ncpu: 8

Desktop:
Code:
~> zpool list
NAME     SIZE  ALLOC   FREE  CKPOINT  EXPANDSZ   FRAG    CAP  DEDUP    HEALTH  ALTROOT
kelder  1.80T   595G  1.22T        -         -    17%    32%  1.00x    ONLINE  -

... and one of the compact Bhyve guests (ZFS pool on a single file):
Code:
$ zpool list
NAME    SIZE  ALLOC   FREE  CKPOINT  EXPANDSZ   FRAG    CAP  DEDUP  HEALTH  ALTROOT
zroot   125G  21.4G   104G        -         -     9%    17%  1.00x  ONLINE  -
 

grahamperrin

Son of Beastie

Reaction score: 828
Messages: 2,659

Everyday:
Previously used:
All my FreeBSD systems are VMs these days, …

Similarly, I more often use VirtualBox than real hardware.
 

Vull

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 517
Messages: 822

Lenovo G50-45 laptop make-believe development machine (since I no longer do much actual development, but rather, just fiddle around):
Code:
# grep -i memory /var/run/dmesg.boot
real memory  = 8589934592 (8192 MB)
avail memory = 7179784192 (6847 MB)
# sysctl hw.model hw.machine hw.ncpu
hw.model: AMD A6-6310 APU with AMD Radeon R4 Graphics    
hw.machine: amd64
hw.ncpu: 4
# pciconf -lv | grep Network
    device     = 'QCA9565 / AR9565 Wireless Network Adapter'
# pciconf -lv |grep -i ethernet
    device     = 'RTL8111/8168/8411 PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet Controller'
    subclass   = ethernet
# df -g
Filesystem   1G-blocks Used Avail Capacity  Mounted on
/dev/ada0p19        23   20     0    97%    /
devfs                0    0     0   100%    /dev
/dev/ada0p2          0    0     0    15%    /boot/efi
/dev/ada0p9         98   88     4    95%    /share
procfs               0    0     0   100%    /proc
fdescfs              0    0     0   100%    /dev/fd
# gpart show
=>        34  1953525101  ada0  GPT  (932G)
          34        2014        - free -  (1.0M)
        2048     2048000     1  ms-recovery  (1.0G)
     2050048      532480     2  efi  (260M)
     2582528     2048000     3  !bfbfafe7-a34f-448a-9a5b-6213eb736c22  (1.0G)
     4630528      262144     4  ms-reserved  (128M)
     4892672   963375104     5  ms-basic-data  (459G)
   968267776    32000000     6  linux-swap  (15G)
  1000267776   199999488     7  linux-data  (95G)
  1200267264    33554432     8  linux-data  (16G)
  1233821696   209715200     9  linux-data  (100G)
  1443536896    50331648    10  freebsd-ufs  (24G)
  1493868544    33554432    11  freebsd-swap  (16G)
  1527422976    50331648    12  freebsd-ufs  (24G)
  1577754624    50331648    13  freebsd-ufs  (24G)
  1628086272    29360128    14  freebsd-ufs  (14G)
  1657446400    50391040    15  linux-data  (24G)
  1707837440    33593344    16  linux-swap  (16G)
  1741430784    50329600    17  linux-data  (24G)
  1791760384    50329600    18  linux-data  (24G)
  1842089984    50331648    19  freebsd-ufs  (24G)
  1892421632    61102080    20  linux-data  (29G)
  1953523712        1423        - free -  (712K)

#
 

hardworkingnewbie

Active Member

Reaction score: 236
Messages: 240

The cheapest mobo for a Threadripper is around $300 USD.... For an Epyc, a compatible mobo is closer to $500 USD. A 64-core Treadripper goes for around $5k. I have to ask myself, "What am I doing that really demands the capabilities provided by a Threadripper setup that cannot be met by a recent AM4-compatible setup? A 1st-gen 8-core Threadripper goes for around $200 USD, but still commands a $300 and up mobo, and eats more power (180W) than a $400 8-core Ryzen 7 5800x (105W).
Few ideas:
  • compiling Chromium
  • compiling Android
  • building a build server.
 

Geezer

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 451
Messages: 771

Laptop:

zpool list
NAME SIZE ALLOC FREE CKPOINT EXPANDSZ FRAG CAP DEDUP HEALTH ALTROOT zroot 912G 272G 640G - - 8% 29% 1.00x ONLINE -
grep -i memory /var/run/dmesg.boot
real memory = 17179869184 (16384 MB) avail memory = 16513425408 (15748 MB) [drm] Got stolen memory base 0x9e000000, size 0x2000000
sysctl hw.model hw.machine hw.ncpu
hw.model: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-5200U CPU @ 2.20GHz hw.machine: amd64 hw.ncpu: 4
zfs list -H | wc -l
14
grep "^ada.: Serial" /var/run/dmesg.boot | wc -l
1

Desktop:

zpool list
NAME SIZE ALLOC FREE CKPOINT EXPANDSZ FRAG CAP DEDUP HEALTH ALTROOT zoback 10.9T 1.65T 9.26T - - 0% 15% 1.00x ONLINE - zohome 1.73T 73.5G 1.66T - - 10% 4% 1.00x ONLINE - zoroot 308G 6.10G 302G - - 0% 1% 1.00x ONLINE -
grep -i memory /var/run/dmesg.boot
real memory = 103076069376 (98301 MB) avail memory = 99909754880 (95281 MB) pci0: <memory> at device 31.2 (no driver attached)
sysctl hw.model hw.machine hw.ncpu
hw.model: Intel(R) Xeon(R) W-3245 CPU @ 3.20GHz hw.machine: amd64 hw.ncpu: 32
zfs list -H | wc -l
21
pciconf -lv | grep "Network"
device = 'I210 Gigabit Network Connection' device = 'I350 Gigabit Network Connection' device = 'I350 Gigabit Network Connection'
grep "^ada.: Serial" /var/run/dmesg.boot | wc -l
2
grep "^nvme.: " /var/run/dmesg.boot | wc -l
4
 
OP
roccobaroccoSC

roccobaroccoSC

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 226
Messages: 749

The cheapest mobo for a Threadripper is around $300 USD.... For an Epyc, a compatible mobo is closer to $500 USD. A 64-core Treadripper goes for around $5k. I have to ask myself, "What am I doing that really demands the capabilities provided by a Threadripper setup that cannot be met by a recent AM4-compatible setup? A 1st-gen 8-core Threadripper goes for around $200 USD, but still commands a $300 and up mobo, and eats more power (180W) than a $400 8-core Ryzen 7 5800x (105W).
It's mostly for bragging :p

One reason I'd rather not go looking for discarded equipment - it's kind of a time sink to find it, test it for compatibility/durability (And discover it's a dud that needs tossing), keep an inventory, etc.
That's the charm of it. It is always a surprise and you never know what will happen. :)
 

Zirias

Son of Beastie

Reaction score: 1,701
Messages: 2,870

Well, this is my private server at home:
Bash:
% zpool list
NAME    SIZE ...
zroot  14.5T

# grep -i memory /var/run/dmesg.boot
real memory  = 68719476736 (65536 MB)
avail memory = 66743795712 (63651 MB)

% sysctl hw.model hw.machine hw.ncpu
hw.model: ... @ 2.10GHz
hw.machine: amd64
hw.ncpu: 8

# Network: 2x Gigabit Ethernet
# (using lagg to get 2GBit to the switch)

% zfs list | wc -l
      130
It does everything I need at home, including:
  • Router/Firewall to the outside world and between local zones (in a VM with exclusive NIC PCI access)
  • AD (samba) for all local users
  • Local fileserver (NFS/SMB)
  • Webserver (nginx as reverse proxy in my DMZ)
  • Media server for my TV set (minidlna)
  • (internal) MTA for my mail domain
  • A package repo builder using poudriere
  • A -CURRENT VM, also using poudriere, to thoroughly test my ports
  • A Windows VM for work
  • Video surveillance with zoneminder
  • Wifi authentication with radius (against the AD) / Wifi management for multiple APs in a Linux VM
 

Trihexagonal

Son of Beastie

Reaction score: 2,355
Messages: 2,977

The laptop I'm using now. obake is Japanese for shapeshifter:

obake
FreeBSD 12.2-RELEASE-p7
Thinkpad T61
Intel Core 2 Duo CPU T7700 @ 2.4GHz
4GB PC2-5300 RAM
Hitachi Travelstar 500GB HDD @7200 RPM
nVIDIA Quadro NVS 140M
14.1" 1440x900 (WXGA+) widescreen
Hitachi CD-RW / DVDRAM combo
Intel HD Audio
Intel PRO/1000 Network Connection
Intel Wirelss WiFi Link 496
Microsoft Trackball Optical USB mouse

This is on the low end in stats of my machines but one of several I use regularly for general desktop purposes like watching or downloading videos, listening to music, surfing the web, graphic manipulation, text editing. etc.

I'm on an Ethernet LAN with commercial router, cable modem and each machine on the LAN has pf firewall running on it.
 
Top