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What is your favorite text editor?

Oko

Daemon

Thanks: 759
Messages: 1,620

#51
:D I sure wish! I'd really like DRM support in Firefox for DRM protected video playback, but to my understanding, Mozilla locks that in to their own compiled binaries.
You understood it wrong. I am running it here on my OpenBSD boxen :) Let me know if you need help with the patches for the FreeBSD port.
 

stratacast1

Active Member

Thanks: 19
Messages: 161

#53
You understood it wrong. I am running it here on my OpenBSD boxen :) Let me know if you need help with the patches for the FreeBSD port.
??????? Blah that's basically the last thing I need to get off Linux in my whole house -.- I'd also prefer Plasma5 or GNOME 3.24+, but like I said, not a requirement
 

Crivens

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator

Thanks: 537
Messages: 1,465

#54
I use nedit for many things. Then vi/emacs or whatever floats the boat. Yes, I'm an atheist ;)
 

SirDice

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator

Thanks: 6,125
Messages: 27,000

#58
No, no, no. The bikeshed has to be red, obviously.

(How did we get from editors to browsers to colors??)
 

macondo

Active Member

Thanks: 54
Messages: 136

#59
I've forced myself to learn vi(1). One of the major reason is that it's typically the only editor that's available on different Unix(-like) systems. So it's quite useful to know at least some of the basic editing commands. Now I'm starting to really enjoy vi(1) and vim(1). Muscle memory has gotten so bad I have many MS Word documents with :wq sporadically appearing in the middle of a page :D
SirDice: try :x

it's faster...
 

Crivens

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator

Thanks: 537
Messages: 1,465

#60
On the last CCC congress was one track of "hacker jeopardy" "what will this do in vi..."
 

shkhln

Active Member

Thanks: 53
Messages: 145

#62
Which one is your favorite?
SciTE

I'd really like DRM support in Firefox for DRM protected video playback, but to my understanding, Mozilla locks that in to their own compiled binaries.
Firefox itself doesn't contain any DRM code. Mozilla's wiki actually mentions three third party components: Widevine (Google), Primetime (Adobe), OpenH264 (Cisco). Though, OpenH264 isn't a DRM module either, it is supposed to be a binary distribution of an open-source codec (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenH264#Move_to_free_to_use_binaries).

I am running it here on my OpenBSD boxen.
I'm really curious as to what it is.
 

stratacast1

Active Member

Thanks: 19
Messages: 161

#63
SciTE



Firefox itself doesn't contain any DRM code. Mozilla's wiki actually mentions three third party components: Widevine (Google), Primetime (Adobe), OpenH264 (Cisco). Though, OpenH264 isn't a DRM module either, it is supposed to be a binary distribution of an open-source codec (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenH264#Move_to_free_to_use_binaries).



I'm really curious as to what it is.
This is true, it isn't IN Firefox, but they ship binaries with the functionality for getting Widevine, which the FreeBSD version does not have. Oko almost makes it sound like his OpenBSD boxen is able to play Netflix in Firefox
 
B

BSDAppentic3

Guest


#64
I've forced myself to learn vi(1). One of the major reason is that it's typically the only editor that's available on different Unix(-like) systems. So it's quite useful to know at least some of the basic editing commands. Now I'm starting to really enjoy vi(1) and vim(1). Muscle memory has gotten so bad I have many MS Word documents with :wq sporadically appearing in the middle of a page :D
Well...vi isn't bad. After all, it is an editor text, and it can accomplish the function because it was programmed.
 
B

BSDAppentic3

Guest


#65
-Snake-
Sorry, I prefer nano. It is much more comfortable and easy-to-use.
But, if I couldn't install it...then I must use ee. That last isn't bad, but for some tasks (like using visudo) I MUST use vi.
If you could be more explicit with what you mean by "text editors" I'll appreciate it. Because there are text editors that comes with a DE or WM (KDE includes Kwrite, i.g.); others that can be installed in whatever place (leafpad); and the others that are editors of terminal/bash/konsole/etc (like ee, vi, nano, etc.)
 

Oko

Daemon

Thanks: 759
Messages: 1,620

#66
This is true, it isn't IN Firefox, but they ship binaries with the functionality for getting Widevine, which the FreeBSD version does not have. Oko almost makes it sound like his OpenBSD boxen is able to play Netflix in Firefox
I figured out you guys are BS-ing anyway so what the heck! Old good Oko can BS as well. 3 pages and 65 post later nobody has the gut to tell the OP that he needs to run a proprietary OS with the official vendor support for his favorite proprietary technologies. This thread should have never had more than 2 posts.

It is so annoying that this forum is full of threads where the person opens by saying: "I want FreeBSD to do the same things on my laptop/desktops as my favorite proprietary system X. I don't care how it works I just want to use it". Great! Let me break the news for you. FreeBSD is not OS for you and you should go away and purchase your favorite proprietary toy.
 

shkhln

Active Member

Thanks: 53
Messages: 145

#68
Well, stratacast1 was explicitly asked here about their favorite proprietary application. Immediate dismissal wouldn't be very polite. As for Widevine, I think there already exists dedicated complaint thread somewhere on this forum.
 

stratacast1

Active Member

Thanks: 19
Messages: 161

#69
Plus the more I get tired of Linux the less I give a crap. Poking around with some tiling WMs and MATE (and relevant to the thread: text editors) because I need a stable OS that is actually stable. Working on configuring editors/kakoune on a FreeBSD machine right now, matter of fact.
 
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