Simple backup protocol for home user.

ralphbsz

Daemon

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I use rsync with good results, but two caveats: 1) it seems to like 16G memory at least
probably due to concurrency while backing up...
I run it on Raspberry Pis (1G memory) all the time. I've been running it since ... forever, when computers had very little memory.

2) some files on the destination are identical
to newly backed up files, but ending in a tilde, like text.txt~, and remain past newer
backups, vs the expected behavior, being deleted,
making the backup area larger than the source. Not a problem in this
use case, but if someone knows if it is a switch rsync needs/doesn't need that I use
it would be useful to know.
On the target side, rsync creates backups of files it overwrites. That's the ones ending in tilde. This is probably useful when using it to copy directory trees, probably not useful when using it as part of a backup strategy. There is a command-line switch to turn it off and on, look at the man page. I would guess it's "-b", but please check.
 

jmos

Member

Reaction score: 19
Messages: 38

2) some files on the destination are identical to newly backed up files, but ending in a tilde, like text.txt~, and remain past newer backups, vs the expected behavior, being deleted, making the backup area larger than the source.
Add the parameter "-v" to rsync, and it tells you more about what's going on. Also check the file permissions and owners of your remote file system; Create a single file on your computer, rsync it, and check the rsynced file owner.

About memory: I've never noticed high memory usage on any computer. And as ralphbsz wrote: It wasn't a problem long time ago when 1 GB memory was just woolgathering…
 
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Dave Lister

Member

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Messages: 31

be aware that rsync is a sync tool - if you have an important file and then you do echo "" > important.txt you end up with an empty file that gets synced to your backup. I have probably used _all_ major backup tools within the last 20 years to find the best tool (yeah, I am a little obsessed with backups), and I recommend borg backup in the first place, restic on the second. (keep your keys for your borg backup in a save place!)
Thanks for the borg backup suggestion. I tried it and it appears to have worked nicely. Proof will be in the eating of the pudding if and when I try to restore after some failure.
 

rootbert

Active Member

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Messages: 233

Thanks for the borg backup suggestion. I tried it and it appears to have worked nicely. Proof will be in the eating of the pudding if and when I try to restore after some failure.
You're welcome. I use borg also with my clients, backing up many TB of small files. I tried many tools, and most of them showing their flaws once you have a serious amount of files and replicas in your backup storage or you want to restore a large amount of files from a backup long time ago. Not so with borg, it has not let me down, and deduplication is a great feature expecially for a home user because usually your data changes not so much - you can keep quite a lot of snapshots of your data without wasting too much space. However, as you have mentioned, testing the restore of files is of utmost importance. And I cannot emphasize enough to keep the borg keys in a safe place (or several places ;-) - a backup without the keys to recover the encrypted data is worthless.
 
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