uptime

roccobaroccoSC

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 210
Messages: 722

I think I have discovered the root cause of FreeBSD unpopularity:
Code:
~> uptime
 8:30PM  up 247 days,  3:38, 6 users, load averages: 0.90, 0.96, 0.93

Nothing really happens...

Code:
  PID USERNAME    THR PRI NICE   SIZE    RES STATE    C   TIME    WCPU COMMAND
 2635 root         17  20    0  2082M  1922M kqread   6 5213.0  56.71% bhyve
 1707 root         17  20    0  2082M  1908M kqread   2 245.5H   1.37% bhyve
19103 root         13  20    0  2073M  1781M kqread   2 201:57   0.53% bhyve
 2409 root         13  20    0  2073M  1791M kqread   6  46.1H   0.44% bhyve

This is not any record, this is just an average...

:) A NUC with Arch:
Bash:
% uptime
 19:06:34 up 175 days, 6 min,  1 user,  load average: 0.39, 0.41, 0.38
 

grahamperrin

Daemon

Reaction score: 675
Messages: 2,143

Code:
root@mowa219-gjp4-8570p-freebsd:~ # bectl mount n249988-2c614481fd5-a /tmp/cooee
Successfully mounted n249988-2c614481fd5-a at /tmp/cooee
root@mowa219-gjp4-8570p-freebsd:~ # chroot /tmp/cooee
root@mowa219-gjp4-8570p-freebsd:/ # ls /usr/home
root@mowa219-gjp4-8570p-freebsd:/ # ls /usr/local
FreeBSD_ARM64                   llvm10                          openoffice-4.2.1602022694
GNUstep                         llvm11                          openoffice-4.2.1619649022
ICAClient                       llvm12                          openssl
VirtualBox                      man                             poudriere
bin                             mono                            sbin
etc                             openjdk11                       share
false                           openjdk11-jre                   steam-utils
furybsd                         openjdk16                       true
include                         openjdk8                        var
lib                             openjfx14                       wine-proton
lib32                           openoffice-4.1.6                www
libdata                         openoffice-4.2.1579913986       x86_64-portbld-freebsd14.0
libexec                         openoffice-4.2.1589199787
root@mowa219-gjp4-8570p-freebsd:/ # exit
exit
root@mowa219-gjp4-8570p-freebsd:~ # bectl umount n249988-2c614481fd5-a
root@mowa219-gjp4-8570p-freebsd:~ # ls /usr/local
FreeBSD_ARM64                   llvm10                          openoffice-4.2.1602022694
GNUstep                         llvm11                          openoffice-4.2.1619649022
ICAClient                       llvm12                          openssl
VirtualBox                      man                             poudriere
bin                             mono                            sbin
etc                             openjdk11                       share
false                           openjdk11-jre                   steam-utils
furybsd                         openjdk16                       true
include                         openjdk8                        var
lib                             openjfx14                       wine-proton
lib32                           openoffice-4.1.6                www
libdata                         openoffice-4.2.1579913986       x86_64-portbld-freebsd14.0
libexec                         openoffice-4.2.1589199787
root@mowa219-gjp4-8570p-freebsd:~ #
Thanks mer
 

ralphbsz

Son of Beastie

Reaction score: 2,342
Messages: 3,236

I'm theoretically a fan of rebooting often. That's simply the admission that no software (not even FreeBSD) is perfect, and everything has the risk of small resource leaks.

The problem with that theory is that my FreeBSD home server is also the network gateway. And if I reboot, the network will be out for maybe 2 or 3 minutes. My wife is a morning person, and gets up way earlier than I do. So when I get up is not a good time to reboot, she's probably busy doing work, or at least relying on her cellphone etc. functioning. On the other hand, our college-age son loves playing computer games with his friends late at night (and he does not get up early). So the time when I either reboot or run freebsd-update is usually a weekend morning, when my wife isn't working (she might be shopping, doing gardening), and our son is still asleep. So a typical uptime for my machine is a week or two. If it reaches a month, that means I've been too busy to check for updates and quickly reboot.

The upper limit is set by SSL certificates: Those need to be renewed every 3 months, and after that the web server needs to be restarted. I think it's silly to restart a major service and leave the rest running (you're disrupting one service, may as well do all of them), so I always use a reboot at that time.
 
Top