TrueOS: anyone using it on a laptop?

scottro

Daemon

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This may be my memory being incorrect, so take it with a grain of salt.

I remember when Ubuntu came out. Lots of people tried it, for fun, for whatever. Regular Linux users who had used Gentoo (or a BSD) had gotten married, had kids, didn't have time, so would use Ubuntu, which most of the time, just worked. Not perfect of course, but it made it a lot easier.

As I remember it, this was part of the beginning of hardware and software vendors putting a bit more effort into getting things working with Linux. So, it used Gnome, there were lots of other deskops, it wasn't ready to compete with Windows or Apple, but it made it a LOT easier to get Linux working with your hardware and software. Therefore if TrueOS, or GhostBSD or any of them, has somewhat similar success, although we'd probably have to work around newcomer-aimed things that got put into it, it would probably make it less difficult to find laptops (or other hardware) that worked with FreeBSBD. Another factor (one of those things I vaguely remember reading, I never tried to verify it or anything, so almost certainly one person's opinion) was that Mr. Shuttleworth had already shown he could fit in the business world, so the fact that it was him trying to get these hardware and software vendors to support Ubuntu was also a factor.
 

scottro

Daemon

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Again, the Ubuntu example. No tech support, just something aimed at the less technical who still have interest, who don't care that much about the style of desktop, so don't care about Lumina flaws. I honestly don't understand why folks in this thread seem to want to discourage this, which, as I said in my previous post, could, if it became popular, be a good thing for FreeBSD. It's not going to compete with Windows and Mac, the desktop and lack of support aren't going to be the things putting people off it.
 

scottro

Daemon

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Going to add this from forum rules, as I find this thread interesting and getting it closed for someone's bad day would be a shame.

Rule for from https://forums.freebsd.org/threads/38922


Personal attacks and profanity (in the context of an argument) are not allowed, and that includes users and developers like. Gross breaches of netiquette, like excerpting or reposting private mail when permission to do so was not and would not be forthcoming, are frowned upon but not specifically enforced. However, there are also very few cases where such content would fit within the charter of a forum and it would therefore probably rate a warning (or ban) on that basis alone.
 

vermaden

Son of Beastie

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Hi Vermaden, It's true HAMMER2 is still unfinished, but as I'm writing this on HAMMER2 now ;) I can tell it's very stable, extremely performing even on legacy hardware and partially resolves the problem of tiny file systems quickly filling up if unmantained. HAMMER2 brings many changes over original HAMMER: See the Design Chart for HEAD, as well as latest improvements in 5.0.2 release.
It would be great to have HardenedBSD with HAMMER2 filesystem, but that int gonna happen fast :p
 

Beastie7

Well-Known Member

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Again, the Ubuntu example. No tech support, just something aimed at the less technical who still have interest, who don't care that much about the style of desktop, so don't care about Lumina flaws. I honestly don't understand why folks in this thread seem to want to discourage this, which, as I said in my previous post, could, if it became popular, be a good thing for FreeBSD. It's not going to compete with Windows and Mac, the desktop and lack of support aren't going to be the things putting people off it.
This is a bit of a special case. Mark and Canonical actually went full force in marketing Ubuntu for the Desktop and funded the development of the infrastructure necessary for it to be a viable platform. I don't any of this from the FreeBSD committers or iXsystems for TrueOS.

But then Mark gave up because, as another person alluded to earlier, there's no money on consumer open source. Who's going to waste money on an idea with no return on investment?
 

scottro

Daemon

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If that question is to me, as I answered on daemonforums, I'm using FreeBSD-CURRENT. (It's best to try to confine topics to one thread, though--investigate questions on the other forum on those forums).

The original question was whether anyone is using TrueOS on a laptop. Some people are. Others will suggest running FreeBSD-CURRENT (on a laptop built after 2013 or 2014), OpenBSD, or something else.

There is no one correct answer to the question of whether one SHOULD run FreeBSD on a laptop, it depends upon your situation, and that actually merits a different thread. This thread is trying (more or less) to concentrate on TrueOS and its good and bad points on a laptop.
 

vermaden

Son of Beastie

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Since I have already done it and already decided I will do it again. I am just wondering "what" hardware any of you recommend?

What are you using in your laptop running FreeBSD or TrueOS?
ThinkPads X220/T420s/T520/W520/X230/W530/T430/T530 work without any issues, with 11.1-RELEASE.

ThinkPad X260/X270/T460/T470/... work with 12-CURRENT and DRM-NEXT.
 

herrbischoff

Active Member

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Messages: 165

ThinkPads X220/T420s/T520/[...way more laptops...]
I just wondered why there appear to be several people here running more than 4 laptops with FreeBSD. Is that meant to be in succession (retired one, got the next) or parallel (all at once)? If the latter, I'd be interested to know why. Because for the life of me I cannot figure out the benefit or running 7 laptops at the same time. :)
 

vermaden

Son of Beastie

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I just wondered why there appear to be several people here running more than 4 laptops with FreeBSD. Is that meant to be in succession (retired one, got the next) or parallel (all at once)? If the latter, I'd be interested to know why. Because for the life of me I cannot figure out the benefit or running 7 laptops at the same time. :)
I do not own all of these laptops/models at the same time ;)

Currently I only have T420s.

I have used FreeBSD 10/11 as work workstation on W530 from my employee, then I purchased private T520 and installed FreeBSD there, after using it for a while (and carrying in a backpack) I decided that it is too big/heavy, so I got T420s and installed FreeBSD there and sold T520. W530 remains at work. My buddy has X220 so I tried once FreeBSD there. The T420 is same in terms of BIOS/firmware as T420s/X220/T520 so it will also work. There is also great list of supported laptops here: https://wiki.freebsd.org/Laptops

Regards,
vermaden
 

MarcoB

Well-Known Member

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I just wondered why there appear to be several people here running more than 4 laptops with FreeBSD. Is that meant to be in succession (retired one, got the next) or parallel (all at once)? If the latter, I'd be interested to know why. Because for the life of me I cannot figure out the benefit or running 7 laptops at the same time. :)
Well because it's fun :). I have 4 different computer here with 4 different os's all running at the same time.
 

Trihexagonal

Daemon

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I have five laptops currently running FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE and one running OpenBSD 6.2. Four of them are Thinkpads, with an IBM Thinkpad T43 due to arrive Monday. I have another T61 that went to heaven, for some reason, when I pulled the USB mouse from the dock while it was compiling ports for use as parts.

I live in a small apartment, in a building that houses around 50 other units, so space is at a premium for me. I always have at least 2 FreeBSD boxen running at once to work from, sometime 3, and my X61 that serves as the music source to my vintage stereo system runs constantly. I leave one in the bedroom and plan to make it into a Kodi box when I have time. However, I am interested in and open to parallel computing options.

I usually don't run them all at once, when I do they are seated at all sides surrounding me, but I can have them all online if I use my Netgear switch with my router. I've rebuilt all my FreeBSD machines at once when the version update was released to save time. The only issue being keeping track where I'm at with each one in ports, and I do that by memory.


Yes, I have thought about what can I do with all these machines at once...

What better way to show FreeBSD can rule as a desktop OS than actually using it as one? On 5-6 machines no less?

Because if it didn't rule, in my book, I wouldn't use it, be here, or continue to promote it like PT Barnum.
 

ILUXA

Aspiring Daemon

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I'm using two machines, one PC and one laptop (T420). (FreeBSD 11.1-RELEASE+FreeBSD 12-CURRENT/Devuan testing)
I'm using both machines at the same time, I use PC mostly for backups and laptop is a workstation.
PC monitor is at left of me, usually I'm watching movies, youtube, etc, or listening to the music,
when using it, while working on a laptop, while sitting on my couch :). For terminal tasks I use ssh.
I use vncviewer (net/tigervnc and net/x11vnc) to manipulate PC.
 
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Sensucht94

Well-Known Member

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I just wondered why there appear to be several people here running more than 4 laptops with FreeBSD. Is that meant to be in succession (retired one, got the next) or parallel (all at once)? If the latter, I'd be interested to know why. Because for the life of me I cannot figure out the benefit or running 7 laptops at the same time. :)
I have FreeBSD on a laptop, NetBSD on a older laptop, NetBSD on Rpi3, FreeDOS on very old laptop, Void Linux+DragonflyBSD on desktop :)

Laptops just keep redundantly multiplicating throughout years, as from time to time there's someone getting rid of one, and me adopting this orphan computer XD
 

Trihexagonal

Daemon

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While you, guys, from TrueOS, are trying to do something,
FreeBSD will never become a good desktop OS,
while its developers use MacOS. Also it is
a very bad marketing strategy, to say
that you're "FreeBSD kernel developer, but I use MacOS..." (Apple™ payed (or paying) some money to this guy?).
You're advertising MacOS then, an operating system for housewives, with a lot of adware...
I was exhausted this morning and if my affect came off as flat or curt I apologize, I've slept a little now but haven't been lately. I don't dislike anyone here or hold a grudge against anyone and I hope I don't give that impression... Sneaker sniffer living down the hall from me the exception, but I digress.

I didn't pick out every video of FreeBSD developers and the like using a Mac, but hopefully this should get my point across and it will be my last on the subject. I have more than done my part as I see it for TrueOS and already said quite enough.

However, I think it imperative to the success of TrueOS for everyone involved in the project to get reacquainted with the real world of people who use desktops (I mean FreeBSD desktops and TrueOS moguls using them. Daily.), and involve a new group of testers before you make the next release. Not necessarily people skilled all the intricacies of FreeBSD, but people who know the basics how to run a desktop and use one on a daily basis. And definitely not me.

That's what you're trying to put out there, a fully functional desktop to match or exceed Linux and if it doesn't work right for people who know what they're doing it won't for those who don't and you are destined to fail. Simple as that.

And when someone advises you of a problem, don't automatically discount it or wait a month before providing a response. It doesn't bode well with the people dedicating their free time to your moneymaking project and makes people think you couldn't care less and their time wasted.

This will be my last post on the subject and I'm done. Succeed or fail it's on you. I do have enough time invested in the project to not want to see you fail, but horse, the water is right here. Drink it or not as you see fit.

Or just continue to tell yourself TrueOS is doing fine and those buzzards circling overhead don't know beans about frijoles.
 

ILUXA

Aspiring Daemon

Thanks: 338
Messages: 545

Unfortunately, the truth is (IMO of course) is that FreeBSD is heavily influenced by Apple™,
and Apple®© is not interested in FreeBSD as in a desktop OS...
Because anyone will never buy those ****** macs ;), that cost much more than it should.

That's what logic says to me, after such interviews with "kernel developers".
 
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herrbischoff

Active Member

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Messages: 165

However, I think it imperative to the success of TrueOS for everyone involved in the project to get reacquainted with the real world of people who use desktops (I mean FreeBSD desktops and TrueOS moguls using them. Daily.), and involve a new group of testers before you make the next release. Not necessarily people skilled all the intricacies of FreeBSD, but people who know the basics how to run a desktop and use one on a daily basis. And definitely not me.

That's what you're trying to put out there, a fully functional desktop to match or exceed Linux and if it doesn't work right for people who know what they're doing it won't for those who don't and you are destined to fail. Simple as that.

And when someone advises you of a problem, don't automatically discount it or wait a month before providing a response. It doesn't bode well with the people dedicating their free time to your moneymaking project and makes people think you couldn't care less and their time wasted.
Yes. That. Thank you. This is exactly what I mean. Reality check time except "works for me" time.
 

herrbischoff

Active Member

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Messages: 165

I do not own all of these laptops/models at the same time ;) [...] There is also great list of supported laptops here: https://wiki.freebsd.org/Laptops
I'm quite relieved! ;) Thanks for the list of supported laptops, should be interesting to check when acquiring used machines.

Well because it's fun :). I have 4 different computer here with 4 different os's all running at the same time.
Alright, point taken — you just can't argue with fun! :)

However, I am interested in and open to parallel computing options.
I like this as a use case.

Laptops just keep redundantly multiplicating throughout years, as from time to time there's someone getting rid of one, and me adopting this orphan computer XD
I totally forgot about this one. The getting-rid-of part is far more common among PC users than Mac users though. Good of you to give those needy orphaned laptops a home where they can thrive. ;)
 

Beno Kurniawan

New Member

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Messages: 13

I am not a power user and not having computer science background. Just a regular person who use computer to work and help my customers solving problems with their machine I sold (the machine software unfortunately only run in Wind*ws).

Come from lin*x reading lots of articles and forums, found the fact that BSD is way much superior in stability and performance.

Tried to build FreeBSD on my laptop by extensively reading the handbook, but my knowledge not yet there. Indeed I successfully have a FreeBSD desktop complete with DE, but then find problems on automounting USB, once this solved, then I found another problems in mounting my ntfs external hdd.

TrueOS fills the gap for a regular user like me to learn BSD deeper while I can start to working with stability and performance of BSD system.

I run TroueOS stable on my A*us laptop.
 
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