Solved Recommendation for a POP server

kjpetrie

Active Member

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My ISP's mail servers have become extremely slow and unreliable, sometimes taking minutes to download, send, or delete mail, considerably slowing down my ability to work. Deleted mail often reappears at the next sync.
Since I have a server on my LAN running mail/postfix which already relays many of my incoming domains to my ISP, I'd like to add a POP server and store mail on that box to be picked up from there by the client on my desktop machine, leaving the ISP's server out of the process for receiving (and possibly sending) mail. I chose POP because I don't think I need the facilities of IMAP as I only have one inbox and store everything else locally.

The problem I've hit is that all the POP3 servers I've found in Ports are old and unmaintained, the newest, mail/popa3d, dating from 2012. I know POP is a very old-fashioned protocol not much used these days, but I would hope there's a modern, reasonably light program to handle it when needed.

What would people here recommend for getting mail from an inbox on my FreeBSD server to claws-mail running on my (Linux) desktop machine?
 

roper

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Sometimes I prefer to think mature and stable rather than old and unmaintained but the only boxes hitting 110 are those I allow.
 
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kjpetrie

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Thanks, I've come to the conclusion I might not need POP3 or IMAP at all, since I have actually got postfix available on the desktop machine, so I could just adjust my server's mail/postfix to relay to that.
 

msplsh

Aspiring Daemon

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A fine solution if you lock down the accepted traffic on your desktop.
 

Jose

Daemon

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Thanks, I've come to the conclusion I might not need POP3 or IMAP at all, since I have actually got postfix available on the desktop machine, so I could just adjust my server's mail/postfix to relay to that.
This should be fine as long as your desktop is not switched off for several days. Also, it will restrict you to the mbox file format in which "(a)ll messages in an mbox mailbox are concatenated and stored as plain text in a single file." This may work for you, but it did not work for me. My inbox has 5,000 messages in it. I have folders with more than 100,000 messages in them.
 

msplsh

Aspiring Daemon

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Both Postfix and Thunderbird support maildir. I'm pretty sure you can specify Postfix to store mail indefinitely until a relay comes back online, too.
 

trev

Daemon

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I use mail/qpopper to retrieve mail from my mail servers.

I'm not sure I understand the problem with mbox format and 5K inbox messages. My inbox has in excess of 10K messages dating back to 1994 and I have no issues (I use SeaMonkey is my mail client - the mail was originally imported from Netscape Communicator on Window NT 4). All up I have 115K messages in non-inbox folders and, again, no issues.
 

Jose

Daemon

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I use mail/qpopper to retrieve mail from my mail servers.

I'm not sure I understand the problem with mbox format and 5K inbox messages. My inbox has in excess of 10K messages dating back to 1994 and I have no issues (I use SeaMonkey is my mail client - the mail was originally imported from Netscape Communicator on Window NT 4). All up I have 115K messages in non-inbox folders and, again, no issues.

My mbox file got corrupted several times, and I had to spend a lot of time fixing it / restoring from backup. This was a pain to do because the file was huge. Maybe your messages are smaller than mine. I was accessing my IMAP server from two clients concurrently.
 
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kjpetrie

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My desktop boots automatically every morning at 8:30 to run a VM using poudriere to build packages, so postfix will start then as well. It stays up for at least 20 minutes, often more, so provided I can find out how to get postfix to send an ETRN all should be well.

So far that's been a problem, as the documentation seems to assume postfix will serve ETRN requests rather than need to send them.
 

Jose

Daemon

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My desktop boots automatically every morning at 8:30 to run a VM using poudriere to build packages, so postfix will start then as well. It stays up for at least 20 minutes, often more, so provided I can find out how to get postfix to send an ETRN all should be well.

So far that's been a problem, as the documentation seems to assume postfix will serve ETRN requests rather than need to send them.
Maybe Fetchmail is for you:
 
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