Other mount: ext2 operation not permited

Crivens

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Messages: 1,641

#28
Ext2 can have 128 or 256 bytes inode size. The kernel ext2 can only handle the 128 bytes version, no idea about the fuse version. The inode size is set when you newfs the thing. Please see the man page for that. Sorry for being so vague, I'm almost asleep and type on my phone. Linux can handle the 128 bytes version quite fine.
 

ShelLuser

Son of Beastie

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Messages: 3,431

#29
Should i install packages with
Code:
 pkg
or not?
Depends. It's basically all personal preference, so whatever works for you. The main thing is that you shouldn't mix installation types. So if you installed binary packages so far then it's not recommended to suddenly start building stuff using the Ports collection (/usr/ports) and vice versa.

So stick with the method you're currently using.
 

ShelLuser

Son of Beastie

Thanks: 1,580
Messages: 3,431

#31
Slightly offtopic (maybe) but... oh well ;) It's still the weekend :)

Another strange question: where it's taught about this?
I honestly don't know. But the thing is, I'm pretty convinced that a lot of us here gained most of our expertise through experience. I've been using Unix since the 90's, almost continuously (more or less) and I've done a lot of weird stuff over the years. That has seriously helped me to gain the experience I have today.

Word of the wise though: don't try to "learn Unix". Why? Well...
Code:
unicron:/ $ ls -l bin | wc -l
      46
unicron:/ $ ls -l /usr/bin | wc -l
     477
unicron:/ $ echo $((46+477))
523
So that's 523 regular user commands available in the base system, so only counting FreeBSD. If I'd look into sysadmin commands (sbin) or the 3rd party software (/usr/local) when we'll reach even higher numbers.

You really don't want to try and memorize all that. It's a waste of time and effort.

Instead focus on key points. I've mentioned it several times already: the FreeBSD handbook. Just start reading it. If you want to teach yourself something then at the very least study chapter 3 which covers FreeBSD basics. That is basically the key here.

Become familiar with the basics of Unix. For example: know how file permissions work (chmod, chown, chflags and setfacl). That's from the top of my head, and I even hardly use the latter. Know how the kernel operates, for example stuff such as kldstat, sysctl and kldload. Know how the boot process works, so roughly what's happening in /boot (and /boot/loader.conf in specific).

Be aware of /etc/rc.conf but also of the existence of /etc/defaults/rc.conf which is just as important. And when you've discovered this realize the existence of /boot/defaults/loader.conf, hmm, could that structure be related somehow? ;)

So.. focus on the basics first. And for everything else? Simple: know where to find the information you're looking for.

man man comes to mind (I'm not kidding here). man -k <topic is one of the most important commands to remember. Yes, you can also use apropos but if you use man you'll also remember the existence of that command.

How to mount ext2 on FreeBSD? Does it even support ext2? Well....
Code:
unicron:/ $ man -k ext2
gnutls_privkey_import_ext2(3) - API function
ext2fs(5) - ext2/ext3/ext4 file system
fsck_ext2fs(8) - compatibility wrapper for e2fsck
ext2, ext3, ext4(5) - the second extended file system ext3 - the third extended file system ext4 - the fourth extended file system
fuse-ext2, FUSE-EXT2(1) - FUSE module for Second Extended File System
e2fsck, fsck.ext2, fsck.ext3, fsck.ext4(8) - check a Linux ext2/ext3/ext4 file system
mke2fs, mkfs.ext2, mkfs.ext3, mkfs.ext4(8) - create an ext2/ext3/ext4 filesystem
debugfs(8) - ext2/ext3/ext4 file system debugger
I think it does :cool: You can then try man ext2fs to learn more (which points to ext2fs(5)).

There's tons of information on Unix available right at your finger tips. You only need to look for it. Then give it a few years and you'll start to know several commands by heart as you gain more experience.

Simply put: there is no better teacher than hands on experience. There are tons of things which the books won't tell you but which are still somewhat common knowledge.

Trying to learn 100 commands from mind is fun, but it will probably only last you for maybe 6 months, especially if you're not using those commands on a regular basis. But if you make sure that you remember where you can look for the commands you need then you've taken the first big step.

Small example: It's been a few years but the very first time I dived into PowerShell (a very impressive Windows commandline environment) it took me approximately an hour or so to get my fingers behind the very bare basics (Get-Help, command profile ($profile, Get-PSDrive, Get-EventLog (I really love this one), New-PSSession, etc.). And all because Microsoft were smart enough to make an alias by default which pointed man straight to Get-Help (and because the PowerShell documentation is actually quite good!).

For me 'Learning Unix' begins with doing man man and then working your way up from there.

Hope this can give you some ideas.
 
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BSDAppentic3

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#32
ShelLuser
So i am not so wrong...
Thanks. Thanks a lot.
Perhaps that's why i am not seeing places nor sites where to learn BSD. Maybe Linux, or languages of programming.
You remember that i said that I took a informatic course a few years ago? Well, in one of the last days, i was talking across whatsapp with who was my professor. He told me that he only knows well about Windows, and a little of Linux.
 
OP
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BSDAppentic3

Guest


#33
ShelLuser
How can i save your reply for read it again?
I mean something like "favorite messages".
What it's the function of "Quote"? That thing with a +.
 
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BSDAppentic3

Guest


#34
ShelLuser
Sorry if i look tedious...but i need someone to bother :p
Well, i saw that here there are species or types of "ranges". Like "member", "daemon", "well known member", "aspiring daemon", "developer", "moderator",etc. What does it means?
 
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