Installing FreeBSD 9 source

OP
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wblock@

Beastie Himself
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9-STABLE has some important bug fixes over 9.0-RELEASE.

As far as sys missing, CVS mirrors can get out of sync, but AFAIK there is only the one svn server. Make sure you have the latest version of devel/subversion.
 

pentafonium

New Member


Messages: 1

Thanks, method 3 was just what I needed.

I still have one question. If I installed a 9.0 and did a freebsd-update (fetch/install), would the system become a -STABLE or do I still have a -RELEASE?

Thanks for the answers.

Kind regards
 

wpostma

New Member


Messages: 13

So now that CSUP is down due to the intrusion is it time at last to simplify and consolidate around SVN?

Am I the only one who wishes the docs above told me how to figure out which version I should get from svn? (releng/9.0 versus stable/9)?

W
 

jb_fvwm2

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One one CPU today I upgraded to fix the 9.0 > 9.1 _ThreadRuneLocale error. (Slight library difference meant some ports built on one would not work on the other, the earlier version was
at fault.)
I found that if you -DNO_PROFILE -DNOPROFILE for buildworld, installworld will fail unless also using those parameters. ("libc_p.a not found")
Now to the main reason for this post, one time compiling subversion and dependencies here crashed xorg, one might want to do it o/o an xterm for that reason.
 

jb_fvwm2

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It may have crashed compiling the dependencies. (It only has 1.5G memory, and the browser usually has many tabs open. Maybe it was the browser that crashed... much more common nowadays with huge complex web pages...)
 

nickednamed

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So if I want the FreeBSD kernel source, I now have two options:

  1. Download and install SVN
  2. Manually download and extract the source.

I'm running FreeBSD 9.1-RELEASE. Would this be the right link for kernel source?

So are there currently no tools in the base system for handling this? If SVN is the future, does that mean these extra dependencies will make their way into the base system?
 
OP
wblock@

wblock@

Beastie Himself
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The source should be the same for either link, but it's a good idea to match the architecture with what is installed, i386 or amd64, just in case there are any differences.

No, svn will not be imported into the base system any time soon. It's a developer tool which many users will not need, and importing it would freeze the version and make updates more difficult.

There are at least three separate efforts under way to make something equivalent to csup(1), something that could get just the source from the SVN repository. None are ready yet.
 

nickednamed

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Ok then. Thanks for the info. Sorry to drag up old threads.

I'm writing a setup shell script at the moment (in case I ever have to do a quick re-install) so I will be sure to include some way of down loading and installing the source from FTP.

Thanks again.
 

SirDice

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The archive was made using / as a start point. Extracting it in /usr/src/ would expand everything as /usr/src/usr/src/.
 
OP
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wblock@

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programmerdams said:
But won't the above command extract it to the root directory, instead?

Yes. This works because the archive contains the /usr/src directories, not just the contents of those directories.
 

mecano

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Re:

Beeblebrox said:
I've been using SVN since about Nov '11. SVN is so much faster than CVS. I would like to see GIT implemented for ports but that's a long way off (bringing ports into SVN structure is a greater priority). I had asked about ports on git here, but that's another issue.

My point: Recommend SVN for /src above anything else.

I do not want to start a devel/subversion/devel/git war but why won't devel/git be good for /src as well?
Anyone tried to get or successfully got the /src with devel/git in svn mode?
 

Carpetsmoker

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Re: Re:

mecano said:
Beeblebrox said:
I've been using SVN since about Nov '11. SVN is so much faster than CVS. I would like to see GIT implemented for ports but that's a long way off (bringing ports into SVN structure is a greater priority). I had asked about ports on git here, but that's another issue.

My point: Recommend SVN for /src above anything else.

I do not want to start a deel/subversion/devel/git war but why won't devel/git be good for /src as well?
Anyone tried to get or successfully got the /src with devel/git in svn mode?

Perhaps because git has an overly complex user-interface, and in general is hard to work with. If anything, I would expect FreeBSD to move to mercurial, which is much more UNIX/BSD-like in many ways.
 

mecano

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Thanks [USER=703]@Carpetsmoker[/USER] and [USER=1677]@SirDice[/USER], these are very interesting answers.
[USER=703]@Carpetsmoker[/USER] dunno about the command line ui for devel/git because I use a gui called GitX (rowanj fork) and for my very basic needs it feels incredibly comfortable.
 
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PacketMan

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First, sysinstall is mostly dead. Avoid it if possible. It won't install the source distribution for you any more.

There are two ways to get the source. Okay, maybe a lot more, but only two will be covered here.

  1. Download the tar file that matches the version you installed.
    i386: ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/i386/9.0-RELEASE/src.txz
    amd64: ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/amd64/9.0-RELEASE/src.txz

    Unpack the archive to /usr/src:
    # tar -C / -xvzf src.txz

    Be aware that this will only get you the code for FreeBSD-9.0-RELEASE, not anything that has been added since then.

<rest of text omitted>

So as a best practice (including 10.x, 11.x etc releases), should I get the source and 'load up' /usr/src right after a fresh install, or maybe I should only do it when there is a program that actually needs to use something from it?
 
OP
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So as a best practice (including 10.x, 11.x etc releases), should I get the source and 'load up' /usr/src right after a fresh install, or maybe I should only do it when there is a program that actually needs to use something from it?

It depends on your use of the system. If you only need the source occasionally, /usr/src can be checked out or deleted as convenient. It is important that it matches with the installed version of the operating system, particularly for ports like VirtualBox and sysutils/lsof.
 

kpa

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Note that the sources you get from the FTP mirrors are out of date because the release distribution sets are not updated after they have been uploaded once. For example if you downloaded this tarball for FreeBSD 10.1 sources you would still have to run freebsd-update(8) to get the really up-to-date sources that match your installed 10.1 system.
 

Phishfry

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AMEN from a 71 year old noob!!
There is a tool in base now to do this: svnlite
So replace svn with svnlite to save you some disk space. Unless you need all the features of SVN.
svnlite checkout svn://svn.freebsd.org/base/releng/12.0/ /usr/src
svn is a port and has some large dependencies. svnlite is in our base.
 

OldSubSailor

Member


Messages: 51

There is a tool in base now to do this: svnlite
So replace svn with svnlite to save you some disk space. Unless you need all the features of SVN.
svnlite checkout svn://svn.freebsd.org/base/releng/12.0/ /usr/src
svn is a port and has some large dependencies. svnlite is in our base.

Thank you for replying. I will take a look at svnlite. Now I do remember the old days of Unix Shell Internet access (before the www came along), but memory fades. Now except for using pkg, I really do not know how to, or in these days, if, one can access the internet via the command line.
 
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