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How is FreeBSD coping with a systemd future?

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Zirias

Well-Known Member

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This might not be directly relevant for FreeBSD ... but in fact, it's a good thing that SOME people working on/with Linux oppose to systemd. Linux is so widespread in the FOSS world, if everyone in this sphere would adopt systemd, this would probably lead to more and more applications ditching portability and hard-depending on some systemd component. So, cheers for the effort :)
 

NewGuy

Well-Known Member

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Like it or not, systemd has already affected FreeBSD. There are more than a few new FreeBSD users because of it, for one thing. It has also forced a reevaluation of init systems, and brought up the question of how FreeBSD can be compatible with software that is written to depend on a Linux monoculture.
I tend to agree. There have been several disruptive technologies introduced in the Linux community in recent years. As a result I've been spending more and more time experimenting and evaluating FreeBSD. Some of my servers are now running FreeBSD where they used to run Linux because the migration path to FreeBSD was easier than the upgrade path to systemd.
 

Carpetsmoker

Daemon

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It's not just systemd; my laptop for example can't even run FreeBSD, since it's a Haswell system of about a a year old. The drivers haven't been ported from Linux, and I can only use the vesa driver with Xorg (which is not good enough). I haven't even checked at the other parts, such as the WLAN or webcam.

I bought a small ZBox Nano system about a year ago (AMD), which also didn't work for the same reason, except that here it were the AMD drivers that weren't ported yet.

OpenBSD does support Haswell by the way, and has since may 2014 (5.5)...
 

tzoi516

Well-Known Member

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OpenBSD does support Haswell by the way, and has since may 2014 (5.5)...
Really? I tried to install OpenBSD 5.5 on my Haswell/Optimus Toshiba laptop, with a i7 CPU and Artheros Wi-Fi and Ethernet. The graphics weren't accurately detected, and it couldn't detect my network hardware.

Ended up going with Arch Linux.
 

Carpetsmoker

Daemon

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Really? I tried to install OpenBSD 5.5 on my Haswell/Optimus Toshiba laptop, with a i7 CPU and Artheros Wi-Fi and Ethernet. The graphics weren't accurately detected, and it couldn't detect my network hardware.

Ended up going with Arch Linux.
That's what the release notes for 5.5 say. I didn't test it myself yet due to lack of time and a sort of okay working Arch Linux system.
 

torimus

New Member


Messages: 1

Another former Linux `convert' here. Heavily testing migration now, so far so good (LDAP, Postgres, Nginx, NFS, VPN, rsync, Puppet etc). Need only to study documentation to IPFW, jails and ZFS as the only really different replacements. Specific system settings and services handling are so simple to grasp, not worth to count in. The time and effort spent I find more meaningful than learning the systemd ecosystem and refreshing skills with gdb and strace I did believe I will never need at my admin job. I have the "luxury" to afford such a change as a complete solution supplier. Would be much more difficult as a corporate employee.

Having also good results with FreeBSD-current on my work lappy (i7, Sandy Bridge, Intel HD3000, Nvidia GT540M - disabled, Broadcom Wifi and Bluetooth, reliable ACPI S3).

I'm sick of the propaganda and FUD systematically fed by authors and spread by zealots, even in the Debian community I did believe is more conservative and too experienced then to succumb to a few individuals without a history or even identity and playing on an emotional basis. See how even in this thread is spread misinformation about forthcoming adoption of systemd/launchd-like init by FreeBSD.

I don't intend to stir up the situation even more but out of curiosity I'd like to know what existing significant projects are actually threatened with losing portability due to enforced hard systemd-subsystem dependency. I'm aware systemd merged a lot of code/functionality from recently standalone projects and am curious how difficult it would be for KDE developers for example to keep independent interfacing to user sessions, power management, backlight settings, logging, credentials etc. Speaking about ports of course, not concerned about system.
 

scottro

Daemon

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I haven't used it since last year or so, but at that time, it would frequently freeze a machine completely--this seemed to be independent of quality of the machine and distribution. Judging from Fedora forums, that I still view, it still has issues. However this might just be FUD from me. It is still, though, as far as I can tell, a work in progress.
 

abishai

Aspiring Daemon

Thanks: 127
Messages: 555

And how does it work?
I used it on Linux Mint installation. 2D obviously works, 3D games works as well in Wine, but with opproximatelly 50% loss of framerate in comparison with Nvidia blob. AFAIK it's because of unimplemented clocking control (nouveau driver can't reclock video card as it boots in energy save mode).
I remember an attempt was made to port nouveau to FreeBDS, but it was never succeed.
 

Martillo1

Active Member

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Messages: 226

50% is not bad. However I give more importance to a working 2D configuration. The change from XAA to EXA made OpenBSD unusable for me.
 
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