Dual boot with Windows 10

circus78

Active Member

Reaction score: 7
Messages: 227

Hi,

I just read Thread 59427, and I wondering if the only way to have dual boot between FreeBSD (11.0-RELEASE) and Windows 10 is with grub.
In my case, I already installed Windows 10 several months ago; today I installed FreeBSD on another partition, and I would like to boot both OS... just in case :) :)
Thank you!
 

metsuke

Member

Reaction score: 5
Messages: 35

I am dual booting Windows 10 and FreeBSD 11.0-RELEASE using only the FreeBSD boot loader.

You can figure out what slices are used by issuing a gpart show
My Windows slice was 1, and FreeBSD was 3.
  • Install bootloader with slices 1 and 3 available: boot0cfg -B -s 1 -s 3 [disk]
  • Enable only slices 1 and 3 in bootloader: boot0cfg -m 0x5 [disk]
 

mickey

Well-Known Member

Reaction score: 85
Messages: 427

For the time being on my UEFI system I use the firmware boot menu (press key during POST) to boot FreeBSD and the Windows bootmanager to boot Windows 7 / Windows 10. My attempts to boot FreeBSD using the Windows boot manager (as I was doing on BIOS/MBR based systems) have so far been unsuccessful. FreeBSD was installed via manual install, FreeBSD's EFI bootloader was copied over to a separate folder on the ESP and if I remember it correctly, I had to create an entry for it using Windows' bcdedit utility:

Code:
Windows Boot Manager
--------------------
identifier              {f4254db9-0bae-11e6-bddd-1c872c606d1f}
device                  partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume1
path                    \EFI\FREEBSD\BOOT1.EFI
description             FreeBSD
locale                  en-US
inherit                 {globalsettings}
Now I can press F8 key during POST and select FreeBSD from a list.
 

vchan

Member

Reaction score: 4
Messages: 43

For the time being on my UEFI system I use the firmware boot menu (press key during POST) to boot FreeBSD and the Windows bootmanager to boot Windows 7 / Windows 10. My attempts to boot FreeBSD using the Windows boot manager (as I was doing on BIOS/MBR based systems) have so far been unsuccessful. FreeBSD was installed via manual install, FreeBSD's EFI bootloader was copied over to a separate folder on the ESP and if I remember it correctly, I had to create an entry for it using Windows' bcdedit utility:

Code:
Windows Boot Manager
--------------------
identifier              {f4254db9-0bae-11e6-bddd-1c872c606d1f}
device                  partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume1
path                    \EFI\FREEBSD\BOOT1.EFI
description             FreeBSD
locale                  en-US
inherit                 {globalsettings}
Now I can press F8 key during POST and select FreeBSD from a list.

These directions worked great for me. I wish I had seen this post before I installed, because now I have a bonus EFI partition after my Windows partition. I just had to copy the contents from that EFI partition to the one on p1. Then I booted into windows and opened an administrator powershell and ran:
Code:
bcdedit /copy "{bootmgr}"
Then I took note of the identifier it gave for the copy; mine was {6be48d15-ccc2-11e7-9de8-54e1ad7c69e8}. Then I edited the description and the path.
Code:
bcdedit /set "{6be48d15-ccc2-11e7-9de8-54e1ad7c69e8}" path \EFI\FREEBSD\BOOTX64.EFI
bcdedit /set "{6be48d15-ccc2-11e7-9de8-54e1ad7c69e8}" description FreeBSD
Then I could just pull up the boot menu and choose FreeBSD. Unfortunately I am missing 200mb that I could potentially use, but that will be something I fix another day.
 
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