Do we still have Ryzen woes?

recluce

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It has been answered a million times already.
Really? I know that the question regarding Ryzen CPU functionality under FreeBSD has been answered (if not a million times). Kindly provide a few links that clearly demonstrate first hand evidence that full Vega Graphics APU functionality is confirmed, including 3D acceleration and hardware decoding of common video codecs, like h.264/h.265.
 

sidetone

Daemon

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Look on the FreeBSD wiki if the graphics chipset driver is available. If the graphics chipset is listed as it works on https://wiki.freebsd.org/Graphics/AMD-GPU-Matrix, then the graphics should just work, whether or not the graphics is on the APU or on a graphics card. For a non-graphical or console desktops, the VESA driver is also expected to work well enough.
The Vega chipset is in the link, labeled as working. 11.2 is the minimum version.
AMDRadeon Pro WXVegaWorks11.2use "amdgpu" kernel module

From a year ago, that list had less capabilities, it said 3d acceleration didn't work for many of them, and now the webpage doesn't mention that, so that is an implication that it has been fixed enough or improved.

Everyone says Ryzen CPU works. I don't have a Ryzen, but I have an AMD GPU, and my video driver off of it works. Perhaps more confirmation is needed for a specific chipset with a latest driver. It really should work. Nothing less than reporting a few bugs. APUs and graphics drivers have come a long way from a few months, and last year, up to two years ago.

I experimented with an AMD APU a few years ago when it wasn't known to work, then I used an additional video card for the available driver. I thought I could help report on if an APU would be treated the same by drivers then as a graphics card. The CPU part of the APU worked without a problem. A few settings, some counterintuitive in bios had to be set to get around limited graphics, and selecting output. I don't remember if the APU worked well with the VESA driver, I believe it did, but overall the VESA driver did work without the video card, and just the motherboard's capabilities. Whether the APU was working with VESA then, or the rest of the motherboard, didn't make a difference, in how slow VESA was for Radeon hardware. Now due to the improvements of graphics drivers, the graphics on the APU works on the same chipset RX Volcanic. The Turks ATI card was supported, otherwise, I needed VESA, back then.

The 5th column is the minimum FreeBSD version. This is a part of the list including all listed cards that need the amdgpu driver.
AMDRadeon HD 7340Northern Islands / WrestlerWorks9.3, 10.0Post 11.2 can use "amdgpu" kernel module via drm-kmod port
AMDRadeon HD 7560DNorthern Islands / CaymanWorks9.3, 10.0Post 11.2 can use "amdgpu" kernel module via drm-kmod port
AMDRadeon HD 7660DNorthern Islands / CaymanWorks9.3, 10.0Post 11.2 can use "amdgpu" kernel module via drm-kmod port
AMDRadeon HD 7700Southern Islands / Cape VerdeWorks11.2use "amdgpu" kernel module
AMDRadeon HD 7800Southern Islands / PitcairnWorks11.2use "amdgpu" kernel module
AMDRadeon HD 7950Southern Islands / TahitiWorks11.2use "amdgpu" kernel module
AMDRadeon HD 8000Sea IslandsWorks11.2use "amdgpu" kernel module
AMDRadeon HD Rx 200Volcanic IslandsWorks11.2use "amdgpu" kernel module
AMDRadeon Pro WXPolarisWorks11.2use "amdgpu" kernel module
AMDRadeon Pro WXVegaWorks11.2use "amdgpu" kernel module
 

olli@

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Developer

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In summary, the question whether the Vega graphics unit is properly supported using Ryzen APUs has not yet been answered.
Yes, it has, and the answer is “it depends”. The Vega graphics of 2nd generation (Ryzen-2xxx) works, the Vega graphics of 3rd-generation (Ryzen-3xxx) does not appear to work yet.

Of course you can always use an additional graphics card; I've put an Nvidia GT 1030 (cheap, low-power, silent) into my workstation and I'm happy with it. Driver support for it is rock-solid.
 

CraigHB

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At some point I'd like to put together a little mini-ITX system using a 3rd gen AMD APU, so hopefully by the time I do that Vega on-board graphics support will have been fully addressed.

In the near future I plan to put together a desktop system with a 3rd gen Ryzen CPU and nVidia graphics so my take on that is it should be fully supported currently.
 

recluce

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Thanks to sidetone and especially Olli, this helps. So if you want to use an AMD APU, there is really no reason for Ryzen 3x00G at the moment, as these still use the Zen+ architecture and offer an incremental improvement over the 2x00G CPUs only. Ryzen 4x00G is supposed to change that, but will not be out before next year.

CraigHB: I assembled a Mini-ITX system with a 2nd generation Ryzen CPU and (fanless) GT1030. I can confirm that this works fully and out of the box, using FreeBSD 12-STABLE, the NVidia proprietary driver and the MATE desktop. As I was lazy, I used sysutils/desktop-installer to install the GUI stack on top of a freshly installed Base system, which worked very well.

I used zroot, simply for the sparse filesystems - I ran into issues with UFS where the installer created some filesystems like /var too small. For that reason (and as I had some leftover parts) I gave the system 8 GB of RAM, even though it is just used as a HTPC.
 

CraigHB

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That's what I hope to do with a mini-ITX build, use it for an HTPC. Right now I'm using Linux on ARM for my TV box, but it just would just be cool to employ FreeBSD as widely as possible. Some big challenges with that, but all part of the fun.

And yes the APU products do seem to lag a generation behind the CPU products. Though if I'm into gen 4 on the APU I might be back at square one waiting for graphics support. In any case using a gen 2 APU might be a better option.
 

recluce

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That's what I hope to do with a mini-ITX build, use it for an HTPC. Right now I'm using Linux on ARM for my TV box, but it just would just be cool to employ FreeBSD as widely as possible. Some big challenges with that, but all part of the fun.

And yes the APU products do seem to lag a generation behind the CPU products. Though if I'm into gen 4 on the APU I might be back at square one waiting for graphics support. In any case using a gen 2 APU might be a better option.
Actually, I moved the two HTPCs in the house to FreeBSD because of issues / challenges with Linux. The worst one was that sound support broke again and again, especially regarding Pass-through of DTS and AC3 over S/P-DIF. Also, audio lagging with Pulseaudio on Linux (when not using Pass-Through) was bad enough on one of the systems that audio frames were dropped or playback sped up to catch up, which led to effects remarkably sounding like a record player skipping and not keeping turn-speeds constant. Lastly, the Ubuntu-based systems tended to randomly self-destruct on updates and reliably blow up when trying to upgrade to a new distro release. Add the shiny new systemd to the mix and I had enough!

Unless you want something exotic, FreeBSD should not be hard to adapt to HTPC use and give you a lot less trouble once it is up and running.

Back on topic: Even with the 2200G, CPU performance is way beyond anything you will need for a HTPC. That thing is running a bit faster than an old server with two Xeon E5345 CPUs here (tested by building FreeBSD from source). Also, the 2200G / 2400G both support Video Core Next and thus hardware decoding for H.262, MPEG-4, VC-1, VP9, H.264 and H.265, just like the newer 3x00G CPUs. So you should be good for low CPU loads during playback as well.
 

CraigHB

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Hey thanks for that info on HTPC and FreeBSD, was wondering how difficult it might be, haven't looked into it at all yet. That's sounds like good advice, just use a gen 2 APU. Sounds like a plan.

I don't have too much trouble with my Linux TV box since I use a product called CoreELEC and those guys deal with things that break. They provide a ready to fly image for my hardware and they do good work, updates are pretty trouble free.

Still I would actually like to get away from PulseAudio as it's written by the same guy that did systemd. Don't think too highly of that guy in terms of programming talent, but I'm not really one to judge since I don't write software for operating systems. I just know I've read complaints about the quality of his code.

Such a case of the Microsoft way of releasing software, put out crap and fix it with patches after it's made everyone's life hell for a time. They should call it Lindows.
 

recluce

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Still I would actually like to get away from PulseAudio as it's written by the same guy that did systemd. Don't think too highly of that guy in terms of programming talent, but I'm not really one to judge since I don't write software for operating systems. I just know I've read complaints about the quality of his code.
Pulseaudio is capable of causing great havoc, even though it often "just works". If you want to avoid Pulseaudio completely, install XFCE as the desktop environment. At that point, nothing depends on Pulseaudio - at least if you build from source, no idea how some ports might be configured for pre-built packages. Just avoid building anything else (e.g. Firefox) with Pulseaudio. You likely want OSS and possibly sndio. My experience is that KODI works best if built with OSS support only.

If you have Pulseaudio on your system to support the desktop environment (e.g. MATE), I would still make sure that KODI is built without Pulseaudio, to make sure it uses OSS. KODI plus Pulseaudio plus DTS/AC3 passthrough is not a happy relationship!
 

CraigHB

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Cool, good info. I've just been using fvwm as my window manager without a desktop environment. Haven't found those full desktop systems to be of any benefit really. Like the simplicity of a basic window manager, but I don't know how that will work out with Kodi which I would use as my media player.

In any case sounds like I would need to use some ports with non-stock configs. I definitely prefer to use the FreeBSD audio stuff. Always try to keep things as FreeBSD as possible especially at the system level. To be honest I'm not much of a GNU fanboy, but it's not something you can avoid and will only get more utilized by FreeBSD in the future. I try not to make an issue of it.

From what I've read FreeBSD is pushing for better GNU/Linux compatibility these days which I don't think is necessarily a bad idea, but I hope they can avoid too much cross pollination. I really don't like the way they manage things in GNU land. FreeBSD has really good management and I hope it stays that way.
 

recluce

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Cool, good info. I've just been using fvwm as my window manager without a desktop environment. Haven't found those full desktop systems to be of any benefit really. Like the simplicity of a basic window manager, but I don't know how that will work out with Kodi which I would use as my media player.
If you just want to run KODI, you have the option to select KODI as the X-Session upon Log-In, in that case you will have no window manager or desktop running.

XFCE is fairly light-weight and well integrated with FreeBSD - and you have the option to <ALT>-<TAB> out of KODI to get to web browser, for example. If you run XFCE, you may need to address screen tearing (e.g. by using Compton as the compositor), this is well covered here on the forum.
 

CraigHB

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Yeah that would be good, being a TV box its only purpose for life would be to run Kodi. Anything else I'd just do from an ssh session.
 
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