Solved Do all parameters of Unbound need to be specified explicitly?

sdf

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Example:

Code:
    # Maximum UDP response size (not applied to TCP response).
    # Suggested values are 512 to 4096. Default is 4096. 65536 disables it.
    # max-udp-size: 4096
The default value of parameter max-udp-size is 4096.
If keeping the default, in other words, don't remove the # in front of it, then its actual value will be 4096? Or still must remove the # to make it clear that the value is 4096?

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ShelLuser

Son of Beastie

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Default means just that. If you don't specify another value then the system resorts back to the default value.
 

nactusberrilli

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Or still must remove the # to make it clear that the value is 4096?
(as is) - the way you have it - triggers the default. If you remove the "#" then you can manually set the value yourself. Of course, you could remove the "#" and set that parameter with a value of 4096, but to me that would be a bit redundant.
 
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sdf

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Thank you.

For parameters that don't have default values, such as the following one, if let the "# private-address:" section of the following example take effect, is it necessary to uncomment "#"?

Code:
    # Enforce privacy of these addresses. Strips them away from answers.
    # It may cause DNSSEC validation to additionally mark it as bogus.
    # Protects against 'DNS Rebinding' (uses browser as network proxy).
    # Only 'private-domain' and 'local-data' names are allowed to have
    # these private addresses. No default.
    # private-address: 10.0.0.0/8
    # private-address: 172.16.0.0/12
    # private-address: 192.168.0.0/16
    # private-address: 169.254.0.0/16
    # private-address: fd00::/8
    # private-address: fe80::/10
    # private-address: ::ffff:0:0/96
 

nactusberrilli

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For parameters that don't have default values, such as the following one, if let the "# private-address:" section of the following example take effect, is it necessary to uncomment "#"?
Correct. Think parameters in functions. A function can have an optional parameter (meaning --> in case you do not provide a param. then a value is assigned automatically - to that particular parameter) or required ( meaning --> the procedure won't happen without a designated value). You'll find that most of these .conf files do just that - they bridge the user's input into a running application. A program (somewhere) will read this file, parse the content into variables and assign those values into a function or some other logical "contraption".

# these private addresses. No default.
The comment reads that in this particular case, for the private addresses there is no default, so yes, you will have to uncomment that parameter and assign it a value. Please note that
Code:
#private-address
is the same parameter with different input value examples. I would think that you'd be able to have an IP(v4) active address as well as an IP(v6) (simultaneously) - but I'm not entirely sure.
 
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