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dns-server using FreeBSD static IP to TLD

OJ

Daemon

Thanks: 253
Messages: 1,038

#26
max21 you may be interested in OpenNIC The members are there mostly for the purpose of learning about DNS. You will find much enthusiasm as well as expert help there. Join the mailing list, or catch us on Freenode #opennic.

PS: The above link is for setting up a server, but I should have given you the main page too: OpenNIC
 

max21

Well-Known Member

Thanks: 17
Messages: 392

#27
OJ, it’s going to be a minute before I try to take-on BIND and friends again. It’s too time consuming especially for someone who knows nothing about networking. I can't even understand all pieces to the puzzle of using a Dynamic-DNS's. I'ts like no goddies until you pay. I rather pay the ISP for a static-IP and take my own chances. I best to go with the Go Daddy suggestion. I already put BIND on the back-burner for next winter. By then I will know a lot more. Anyway, I always use various OpenNIC DNS’s and I tinker around at their site and others from time to time. I just made my move to soon to try BIND, only to learn that it was not the solution for my present problem unless I had the proper tools (static-IP). Just having a public domain-name to play with is not enough, but I don't regret it.. It IS my next thing to do but not today because there are too many web tools to learn and I got to know three of them in-order to get to know the first on. After I can do that much then I will know. It's the key to jail-communication or networking itself, in my view.

Now I find something new to me, that is right up my ally. I thought I had the ultimate FreeBSD disk layout and I always boost about it, but now ShelLuser went off and invented a masterpiece, months ago. To me, now there’s a real reason to try ZFS. All I do anyway is partitioning, multi-booting, desktops -- disk work, and with his new way, I can relax again, and do the web thing as I go on the already prepared machine.

Thanks for those great tips about BIND OJ

… not excluding all the rest above.


https://forums.freebsd.org/threads/63201/


BTW: I take that back. freedns.afraid.org is super cool :)
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OJ

Daemon

Thanks: 253
Messages: 1,038

#28
Actually one doesn't need to understand as much as you seem to suggest. You could just set it up using the defaults and cut/paste the file from the OpenNIC site and you're good to go. Done. It is admirable and a good idea to try to learn more, but it's not mandatory for a functioning setup. In my case I do have a static IP at home, but I put the nameserver on a VPS (which I also use as my VPN). As a matter of general information, a VPS is dirt cheap these days - such as $10 per year or less. Times have changed.
 

max21

Well-Known Member

Thanks: 17
Messages: 392

#29
Actually one doesn't need to understand as much as you seem to suggest. You could just set it up using the defaults and cut/paste the file from the OpenNIC site and you're good to go. Done. It is admirable and a good idea to try to learn more, but it's not mandatory for a functioning setup. In my case I do have a static IP at home, but I put the nameserver on a VPS (which I also use as my VPN). As a matter of general information, a VPS is dirt cheap these days - such as $10 per year or less. Times have changed.

OJ, $10 per year = starvation here in the US, but D. T. pays Twitter even less, iirc he said $1.95. I say; websites for a dollar, well you never get one from me. LOL. Just kidding, I might go that route someday, Go Daddy did. So, its just like a train; set the route, pop in the battery, flip the switch and watch it go. Back in my programming days, at the forum when given code or receiving help to write code, the only thing they ask of you was “step-thru-it and learn exactly what it does, and why”. I been like that ever since.

Anyway, I can do that, but there a few things I rather hear from you because I found no details yet about things I would like to be sure of. Could you provide some hints to these questions? I see there are only two main options and I don’t want to take for granted that it does exactly what it sounds like. I can guest what questions 2 & 3 mean but I would never be sure. It be something like. ..No, we did not mean it like that. .. it’s not yellow, it’s green.


1)
What are the main benefits of running a private-use Tier 2?
If we both had our own private-use Tier 2, is there a function where can we use each other as slave-dns servers, privately?
Why would we want to do that?

I would think the main benefit is I can use it with a Dynamic DNS from FreeDNS since I don’t want the added expense of a static IP, OR, I think with my own dns-server I can resolve my domain-name IP address on my own and it will show my website (now in development) on my computer when I type myregistereddomain.com into my web browser, and that - - only I can do that before going public with the website. I wonder if I could do that much even without having a static IP. I don’t know the true meaning yet but I think by using the private-use Tier 2 on DO that we can act as a slave-dns for one another privately if there is such a thing.

2)
Are there any benefits of running a public Tier 2 other than a server for OpenNIC or as a local nameserver - - which I don’t have a LAN or Network. My development machine only have web-related jails, including owncloud someday soon?
Let's say; if we both had our own public Tier 2 server, with this options is this the only way that we can use each other as slave-dns servers, if so, when you use it for your internal network and I use it for my (if I do one with users), would all of that be totally private for each of us other then matching dns records?

I think DNS knows nothing but privacy but I don't know so I ask. I could be wrong but since my domain-name provider runs many dns-servers around the world there is no need for me to run a public-dns server. .. and as far as a private LAN or network which I don’t have, it would be useless unless one need it for OwnCloud or to open a online store but I thought that only require running a CDN and a database (i'm not sure). I'm also thinking that this option might be the ONLY way to work as a slave-dns for each other. I wonder if the rest of the world would use this public dns-server and clog it up casuing me to waste time needed for plain web development. And I wonder why I would want to do this.

3)
What VPS provider are you using and why?


These questions might not been asked properly and I understand more then I think but why risk it when you never meant it. I don't mean to keep being a cry-baby but Its difficult to create scenarios without any previous experience. and when it time to discuss this with an associate or on a VPN ticket, I would like to give them a clue that I kind of know what I am talking about. Being a little dense at home, I can live with that but not on the outside Dad :)

I got it while editing. Thank OJ That's all the step-thru I need!
 

OJ

Daemon

Thanks: 253
Messages: 1,038

#30
OK, I fear that I can quickly get out of my depth here as I'm just an amateur who has neither time nor ability to "step-thru-it". I'm basically just a junkyard hacker in the crudest sense of the word. My ambitious and adventurous involvement has been supported by good luck and helpful people who actually know what they're doing.

1) Knowing it's not being logged is one of the benefits which most people value. Some folks are paranoid, but most just insist on upholding the principle. It is also faster to have a lookup closer the the query. I chose to slave to what I consider the most reliable OpenNIC server. To me this has to be OpenNIC because I want access to those TLDs as well as ICANN. Regarding static DNS, I just asked my ISP and they gave me one free - you might try the same in case that's available there. In any case since I use a VPN there is a tunnel to my VPS running openVPN regardless of my home IP.

2) The benefits of running a public Tier 2 with OpenNIC is that you are contributing to the project. The more servers we have around the world the better. OpenNIC is not at all like all those other dns-servers around the world. It is an alternate root. This does not really have a lot of direct benefits, although some communities make good use of it. However, the very idea of keeping the internet free and open for alternative ideas that don't have one single point of failure or control (ICANN) is of interest to some people.

3) I have many VPS around the world which are chosen on varying criteria. One is even as low as 3 Eoros per year and works very well. For good bandwidth with high reliability I have a number with a company called Ramnode and in the last couple of years they have not glitched and have only rebooted once for the recent Intel kernel vulnerability fix. I pay $15 per year for each of those. I have other recommendations or comments on in between providers, but you can have a look here, but note that those are not all good and a little research is recommended.
 
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