Solved Dealing with python orphaned packages

Hi, I am using FreeBSD 13.0-RELEASE-p1 and pre-built packages.
I got this message by email:

Code:
py37-asn1crypto-1.4.0 ? orphaned: devel/py-asn1crypto
py37-bcrypt-3.2.0 ? orphaned: security/py-bcrypt
py37-cffi-1.14.5 ? orphaned: devel/py-cffi
py37-cryptography-3.3.2 ? orphaned: security/py-cryptography
py37-dnspython2-2.1.0 ? orphaned: dns/py-dnspython2
py37-future-0.18.2 ? orphaned: devel/py-future
py37-netmiko-3.1.1_1 ? orphaned: security/py-netmiko
py37-paramiko-2.7.2 ? orphaned: security/py-paramiko
py37-pip-20.2.3 ? orphaned: devel/py-pip
py37-ply-3.11 ? orphaned: devel/py-ply
py37-pyasn1-0.4.7 ? orphaned: devel/py-pyasn1
py37-pycparser-2.20 ? orphaned: devel/py-pycparser
py37-pynacl-1.4.0 ? orphaned: security/py-pynacl
py37-pyserial-3.5 ? orphaned: comms/py-pyserial
py37-scp-0.13.3 ? orphaned: security/py-scp
py37-six-1.15.0 ? orphaned: devel/py-six
py37-termcolor-1.1.0_1 ? orphaned: devel/py-termcolor
py37-textfsm-1.1.1 ? orphaned: textproc/py-textfsm

So, I checked on another system where I am actually using ports, and I found this in UPDATING file:

Code:
20210425:
  AFFECTS: users of python
  AUTHOR: kai@FreeBSD.org

  The default version of python3 and python was switched to 3.8.

  For ports users wanting to keep version 3.7 as default,
  add DEFAULT_VERSIONS+= python=3.7 python3=3.7 to make.conf

  Following procedures may ease the upgrade:

  For users of pre-build packages:
  # sh
  # for i in $(pkg query -g %n 'py37-*'); do pkg set -yn ${i}:py38-${i#py37-}; done
  # pkg upgrade

So I ran the stated commands and manually removing some py37 packages (by replacing it with py38-version).
Did I followed the correct steps to manage this?
 
What is the suggested way to "stay up-to-date" for pre-built package users? I mean how can I fill up the lack of UPDATING file?
 

SirDice

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
pkg upgrade and pkg autoremove. Most of the time that's all you need to do.
 
pkg upgrade and pkg auto-remove. Most of the time that's all you need to do.
I'll toss in my 2 cents here:
SirDice is correct (did you really think he wasn't? :) )
I tend to get conservative, so I get the list of packages by using pkg autoremove and then investigate dependencies before just saying "yes".
 

SirDice

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
I tend to get conservative, so I get the list of packages by using pkg autoremove and then investigate dependencies before just saying "yes".
Yes, definitely double check what it wants to remove. If you want to keep something that pkg-autoremove(8) wants to remove you can set that package as "non-automatic" with pkg set -A0 <packagename>.
 
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