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Find out about my processor

Discussion in 'System Hardware' started by PatrickBaer, Oct 14, 2010.

  1. PatrickBaer

    PatrickBaer New Member

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    Morning!

    I would like to find out, whether my processor, mainboard, memory supports 64bit or not. How do I do this without loosening any screws? :)

    Thanks in advance!

    P.
     
  2. SirDice

    SirDice Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Find the type of processor using dmesg(1). Then look it up on the internet.
     
  3. PatrickBaer

    PatrickBaer New Member

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    Not really...

    I tried sysinfo, which told me:

    Code:
    [pba@harrison ~]$ sysinfo cpu
    Generated by SysInfo v1.0.1 by Daniel Gerzo
    
    CPU information
    
    Machine class:  i386
    CPU Model:      Intel(R) Pentium(R) D CPU 3.00GHz
    No. of Cores:   2
    Cores per CPU:  
    
    WARNING: Your CPU supports amd64 architecture, however you are running i386.
    WARNING: You may want to switch to amd64 to get a better performance.
    
    
    Why AMD64, when running INTEL? Or does it just refer to "any 64bit of your choice"?

    However, why does my bootdisk (i64) refuse to boot if the cpu is supposed to support it? :)

    (MB is a p5wd2e-premium btw)
     
  4. Beastie

    Beastie Member

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    A Pentium D supports the x86-64 instruction set so you can install FreeBSD-amd64 instead of FreeBSD-i386. FreeBSD-ia64 is for the Itanium only.
     
  5. PatrickBaer

    PatrickBaer New Member

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    That's cool. So off to the hardware store, get 4 Gigs more :)
     
  6. User23

    User23 Member

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  7. SirDice

    SirDice Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Even if a certain chipset allows for more memory this doesn't mean the mainboard will. Implementation differences might mean that the mainboard accepts less memory then the maximum the chipset allows. In other words, check the manual for your mainboard to see how much memory it's capable of handling.

    Unless you have an A-brand PC this will require opening up the box to find out what the brand and model of the mainboard is.
     
  8. jem

    jem Member

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    AMD were the first company to develop 64-bit extensions for x86 processors, so software written for that architecture is often labelled amd64.
     
  9. SirDice

    SirDice Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Exactly. The Intel version was officially named EM64T but by that time FreeBSD-amd64 already existed. Intel now calls EM64T Intel 64 which, in my opinion, is too easily confused with IA-64 (an entirely different beast).