Wine failure

KenGordon

Active Member

Reaction score: 21
Messages: 200

I need to be able to run a couple of WIndows apps on my FreeBSD box, among them one named AirMail, which is does digital ham radio stuff. I did pkg install wine, which appeared to go correctly. When I then went to the executable for AirMail and tried to start it, Wine gave me some stuff about needing gecko and something else. After I let Wine go get those and install them, when I then try to activate any Windows executable, I get a clock icon, which hangs there for some time, then just quietly "goes away" and nothing happens.

Anyone else run into this or something similar?

Ken Gordon
 

Trihexagonal

Daemon

Reaction score: 1,117
Messages: 1,805

I hate to beat a dead horse but I know this pony will run...
I did pkg install wine, which appeared to go correctly.
You're mixing ports and pkg. That's generally not considered to be a good thing for people who have been using FreeBSD for a while and I only do as a last resort to get something installed. Sometimes then it breaks or doesn't write to every file like it should and I can fix it. GIMP and having to create machine-id comes to mind.

When I then went to the executable for AirMail and tried to start it, Wine gave me some stuff about needing gecko and something else. After I let Wine go get those and install them, when I then try to activate any Windows executable, I get a clock icon, which hangs there for some time, then just quietly "goes away" and nothing happens.
That probably wouldn't happen with the Master of Ports. Sometimes things need to be installed in the correct order, or reinstalled in the build process.

I would advise you to use ports or pkg. Not both. I'm not the same situation as you, I just run a desktop, but I would do what it took to get ports installed and stick with portmaster.

I taught myself to use ports the hard way by trial, lots of errors and google-fu instead of the Handbook so I can sympathize with you having a hard time. But you're bringing a lot of it on yourself, Hoss.
 
OP
OP
K

KenGordon

Active Member

Reaction score: 21
Messages: 200

Thanks, but I have been absolutely adamant against mixing packages and ports. So far, everything I have installed on this machine has been via the packages. I also did a pkg upgrade before I ever started installing needed apps. That resulted in some 400 MB of "stuff" being worked on.

Therefore, it looks as though you are telling me that Wine installed those two PORTS, gecko and whatever else, from the ports thereby mixing packages and ports for that particular app, wine. So, I think I need to uninstall ( pkg delete wine). then find those other two apps that wine thinks it needs and delete those by hand. Then reinstall the whole shebang via the packages. Is that correct? Or would you advise simply installing wine and its dependencies via the ports?

But, in that case, wouldn't I be mixing packages and ports, since everything else I have installed has been by the packages.? Or, by "mixing packages and ports" do you mean for ONE particular app, and not for the entire system? I.e., on my system, can I install a particular app via the packages, and a different app via the ports without difficulty?

I tried to pkg install gecko during an earlier attempt to get wine operational, but gecko couldn't be found in the packages.

I had thought about installing wine, etc., from the ports, but I feel less than confident about finding and installing all the dependencies, plus there is my extreme desire to NOT mix packages and ports. Due to some earlier "difficulties" with my new system, I am avoiding mixing the two like the plague.

Your advice?

Ken Gordon
 

Trihexagonal

Daemon

Reaction score: 1,117
Messages: 1,805

Thanks, but I have been absolutely adamant against mixing packages and ports. So far, everything I have installed on this machine has been via the packages.
I must have been mistaken. I assumed that by this you meant you used portmaster to install a third party program on your machine.



I had thought about installing wine, etc., from the ports, but I feel less than confident about finding and installing all the dependencies,
ports-mgmt/portmaster

That's what I've been trying to tell you. It does that for you.
 

Sevendogsbsd

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 366
Messages: 778

Ken - I believe there are 2 wine packages: 32 bit and 64 bit. Not sure which your application requires. If 32 bit, then install the 32 bit wine package: "i386-wine". If 64 bit, then install the "wine" package. The gecko and mono package names are "wine-gecko" and "wine-mono" respectively.

Perhaps there is a bit of terminology confusion: a port is the source code of an app in the ports tree /usr/ports that gets compiled into a package and installed behind the scenes using the package system. Package are pre-compiled binaries. For consistency, I always refer to installing a "package" if I am referring to the pkg command and "port" if I am referring to using the ports tree as mentioned earlier, or the tool trihexoganal referred to earlier ports-mgmt/portmaster.

The source code of ports is always newer than the code used to compile pre-built packages so that's why not mixing is advised. The version differences can cause problems with dependency versions.

Sorry, that was long but hopefully made sense.
 
OP
OP
K

KenGordon

Active Member

Reaction score: 21
Messages: 200

I must have been mistaken. I assumed that by this you meant you used portmaster to install a third party program on your machine.

Oh. I can see where the confusion lies: I was not the OP of that thread, and as far as I can see, it was the OP who used portmaster for his work. I joined that thread far down on the "list" because the OP was having much the same sorts of problems I was with my Nvidia install. Turns out MY problems were mainly due to my "fat-fingering" a file.

ports-mgmt/portmaster

That's what I've been trying to tell you. It does that for you.
Thank you for that. I have not yet learned enough to use portmaster, but I can see now that it is probably past time that I did. I'll work on that now.

BTW, that brings up a point: how does one determine the "number" of a thread? I have not been able to find that yet.

Ken Gordon
 
OP
OP
K

KenGordon

Active Member

Reaction score: 21
Messages: 200

Ken - I believe there are 2 wine packages: 32 bit and 64 bit. Not sure which your application requires.
Neither am I. My system is a 64 bit system, but from some things I have read, perhaps I should be using the 32 bit Wine. I'll figure that out eventually.
If 32 bit, then install the 32 bit wine package: "i386-wine". If 64 bit, then install the "wine" package. The gecko and mono package names are "wine-gecko" and "wine-mono" respectively.
Thank you for that info.
Perhaps there is a bit of terminology confusion: a port is the source code of an app in the ports tree /usr/ports that gets compiled into a package and installed behind the scenes using the package system. Package are pre-compiled binaries.
I finally figured that out, which is why I did pkg upgrade at one time. I figured that doing that would "upgrade" any packages I needed to the latest versions. That worked for at least one file I needed.
For consistency, I always refer to installing a "package" if I am referring to the pkg command and "port" if I am referring to using the ports tree as mentioned earlier, or the tool trihexoganal referred to earlier ports-mgmt/portmaster.
As I mentioned, I need to learn about port-master. Dunno much more about it at this point than that it exists. I'll work on that.
The source code of ports is always newer than the code used to compile pre-built packages
Ha! I (eventually) figured that out too. :)
so that's why not mixing is advised. The version differences can cause problems with dependency versions.

Sorry, that was long but hopefully made sense.
Yes, it most certainly does make sense and I thank you for it.

Now....to work

Ken Gordon
 

Trihexagonal

Daemon

Reaction score: 1,117
Messages: 1,805

BTW, that brings up a point: how does one determine the "number" of a thread? I have not been able to find that yet.
I just woke up and only on my second cup of Java, but if this is what you mean:

"I took those rules directly from the same ruleset I'm using now. Watch the boot screen and see if you can catch what lines it's on. The only thing I see ATM that could be a syntax error might appear on line #2. (If you didn't change "Network Interface Designation Goes Here" to what it shows in ifconfig.)"


That applies to a syntax error in /etc/pf.conf and it will show the line number it fails at on the screen during the boot process to inform you pf did not start.
 

Trihexagonal

Daemon

Reaction score: 1,117
Messages: 1,805

Thank you for that. I have not yet learned enough to use portmaster, but I can see now that it is probably past time that I did. I'll work on that now.
I may be oversimplifying things but there really isn't anything to learn about using it. You call it to install a new program with this command, modified to suit your program:

# portmaster www/firefox

Then it will show you screens of the dependencies it will pull in and give you the option to change any of the default variables. Always read what it says (before you Windows click away Enter at anything), not to imply you would do that. For instance, if you didn't enable IPv6 buring the base system build process make sure you disable that option when the screen shows it enabled by default. If it doesn't need changed to suit your needs don't change any default settings.

When it's done it will list all the dependencies to be installed, or any that will be rebuilt during the build process and the program you want built at the bottom of the list to be installed last.

Then you hit Enter to OK it and go for a smoke while it does its thing. I run it from the login terminal so the screen doesn't go dark every 10 minutes and can keep an eye on its progress at a glance. If it stops at an error it's much the same process of figuring out what needs done to continue on as if you had done it manually. Only now after you fix it you restart portmaster like you did at the start. It will not do the same work twice and finish out the build where it left off.
 
OP
OP
K

KenGordon

Active Member

Reaction score: 21
Messages: 200

Thanks for that.

I have downloaded and printed off everything I could find on the web about installing Wine on FreeBSD. From what I can see there, I should be using i386-wine instead of wine as I have been attempting. I am still a bit confused on that issue, but trying to use straight wine, has not worked. More work to do. And again, thank you for your help and patience.

Ken Gordon
 
OP
OP
K

KenGordon

Active Member

Reaction score: 21
Messages: 200

So, I tried to install Wine according to the WineHQ Wiki on a different installation of FreeBSD. Still no joy. Back to the drawing board.

Ken Gordon
 
OP
OP
K

KenGordon

Active Member

Reaction score: 21
Messages: 200

Specifically, I cannot get Wine to install correctly apparently, nor run, on two computers. I have tried every method I know about or have learned about to do so, and none works. I have read, and printed off, everything I could find on the web and in the Handbook and on this forum about this before I ever started.

Yesterday, I finished the main part of the installation of FreeBSD on this computer, which is our main office computer, and every other application I have so far installed works just fine...except Wine.

I first attempted to install i386-wine via pkg install i386-wine AFTER I did the same with wine-mono and wine-gecko (since both were supposedly "necessary"), then did i386-wine. The installations appeared to go forward without problems.

But, when I then attempted to run MS-Word, it hung for several seconds, then just quietly quit. I then attempted to run another WIndows program, specifically, my Pegasus e-mail client. The same thing happened.

I then did pkg delete (program) for all three, then installed them all via the individual ports. That took a lot longer than doing it via the packages, and included what seemed to me to be a lot of additional (supporting?} programs. I got the same result when attempting to run any MS program as before.

I then deleted everything, leaving out of the process both wine-mono and wine-gecko, reinstalled only i386-wine, and attempted to run MS programs via Wine and got the same result.

Then I deleted everything, and tried doing as before, but with Wine (64 bit?). Same result, for both methods.

Now, FYI, I have mounted my MS drives (I have three separate drives in one computer, and two in this one) via the necessary methods, installing Fuse, making the appropriate edits to /etc/rc.conf and /boot/loader.conf, then doing ntfs-3g /dev/ada0s2 /media/Win10. I can easily find the drive, and its contents.

I run FreeBSD on both computers from one of those separate bare drives in each computer.

But getting any MS program, even the most simple, to run with Wine fails every time. I am about to give up on it. I can live without it, although if I am really going to stop using Win10 as much as possible, this is making it very inconvenient.

Ken Gordon
 

patovm04

New Member

Reaction score: 6
Messages: 13

What about if you run winecfg or wine wordpad in a terminal. Does anything show up??
Just to corroborate that wine was properly installed
 

Sevendogsbsd

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 366
Messages: 778

Typically, wine should be invoked from a terminal as patovm04 noted above. I don't know if whatever desktop you use will automatically associate with wine apps so the terminal is probably your best bet. Also gives the added benefit that you can see if any error messages are generated. FYI, what versions of Microsoft office are you trying to run? I would venture a guess that any modern (last 5 years?) version of Office will have issues in Wine but I may be wrong. I have never owned Microsoft Office before and only use it on my work machine which is Windows so have no experience running it in wine.

If there is no compelling reason to run Office (custom macros, etc), I would suggest Libreoffice as its is free, open source and works well, for my limited purposes anyway.
 
OP
OP
K

KenGordon

Active Member

Reaction score: 21
Messages: 200

What about if you run winecfg or wine wordpad in a terminal. Does anything show up??
Just to corroborate that wine was properly installed
I get "command not found" for both.

Also, when I do find / -name "wine", nothing shows up.


Going through my terminal history, I see that after I deleted all wine associated programs, I then cd to /usr/ports/emulators/wine and did make install clean, so from the above it appears that wine never completed the installation.

Sigh...:confused::(:mad:

After that, I installed both Thunderbird, and Retroshare, both of which work fine.

Ken Gordon
 
OP
OP
K

KenGordon

Active Member

Reaction score: 21
Messages: 200

Typically, wine should be invoked from a terminal as patovm04 noted above. I don't know if whatever desktop you use will automatically associate with wine apps
I am using the desktop which comes with FuryBSD and it DOES offer the choice of using Wine for MS and other apps.
so the terminal is probably your best bet. Also gives the added benefit that you can see if any error messages are generated.
That sounds like an excellent idea. I'll try that.
FYI, what versions of Microsoft office are you trying to run?
2007.
I would venture a guess that any modern (last 5 years?) version of Office will have issues in Wine but I may be wrong. I have never owned Microsoft Office before and only use it on my work machine which is Windows so have no experience running it in wine.
I remember running it on a Unix box at work many years ago, and it worked fine there.

If there is no compelling reason to run Office (custom macros, etc), I would suggest Libreoffice as its is free, open source and works well, for my limited purposes anyway.
I have LibreOffice installed on all of my FreeBSD boxes here. Although I like it and it is OK, it does lack some of the features of MS-Office I have gotten used to. I have also installed Okular and another app for reading PDFs. Those work fine too.

But first I am going to have to figure out how to install wine (and which version) and its dependencies. Trying to do that from the ports hasn't worked....yet.

Ken Gordon
 

Sevendogsbsd

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 366
Messages: 778

Forget ports, just use pkg install <package name>. They both do exactly the same thing.

So, I don't know if Office 2007 is 64 bit or 32 bit. I use wine for gaming only and all of my games are 32 bit so I use i386-wine. You can try pkg install wine, then open a terminal in the directory where you have your office install file, then run wine <office installer name>. If that doesn't invoke the Microsoft Office install dialog, then you can install i386-wine and try the same thing.

Make sense? You'll use wine to install Office, then you need to navigate to the directory where the office app (word, excel, etc) is located under ~/.wine and then use wine to run the specific executable. If whatever desktop you are using automagically makes icons, you can probably use those.
 

patovm04

New Member

Reaction score: 6
Messages: 13

I get "command not found" for both.

Also, when I do find / -name "wine", nothing shows up.


Going through my terminal history, I see that after I deleted all wine associated programs, I then cd to /usr/ports/emulators/wine and did make install clean, so from the above it appears that wine never completed the installation.

Sigh...:confused::(:mad:

After that, I installed both Thunderbird, and Retroshare, both of which work fine.

Ken Gordon
So clearly you don't have wine installed. Try installing wine with sudo pkg install i386-wine as Sevendogsbsd suggested.
Also, are you trying all of this on FuryBSD live iso or do you have it installed on your hard drive ??
 
OP
OP
K

KenGordon

Active Member

Reaction score: 21
Messages: 200

So clearly you don't have wine installed.
Ha! Obviously. :)
Try installing wine with sudo pkg install i386-wine as Sevendogsbsd suggested.
Did. Now I find it.
Also, are you trying all of this on FuryBSD live iso or do you have it installed on your hard drive ??
On the HD.

FuryBSD, apparently, differs from FreeBSD 12.1 only in the desktop. All else, so far as I can see, is just plain, complete, unadorned, unadulterated FreeBSD 12.1.

There are a couple of reasons I have not mentioned FuryBSD here before: 1) the FuryBSD forum is unoccupied: the few questions I have posted there have been unanswered. 2) All of my questions here have concerned my use of FreeBSD, not of FuryBSD. 3) Discussion of FuryBSD (and others somewhat like it) is frowned upon here, which I understand and want to comply with.

Anyway, getting back to Wine, when I do as Sevendogsbsd suggested, I get the following error:
"ELF interpreter /libexec/ld-elf.so.1 not found, error 8
Abort"

So, obviously, some dependency is missing. Now I have to find and fix that.

Ken Gordon
 

Sevendogsbsd

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 366
Messages: 778

I think (someone correct me if I am wrong) that this means the core OS is missing the 32 bit libs. Is this correct?
 
OP
OP
K

KenGordon

Active Member

Reaction score: 21
Messages: 200

I think (someone correct me if I am wrong) that this means the core OS is missing the 32 bit libs. Is this correct?
Yes. You are correct. I found a thread here which dealt with that, and told how to fix it. I did fix THAT problem, but got a heap of new error messages. See the LibreOffice PDF file below detailing those.
Ken Gordon
 

Attachments

Top