Solved Two disks, two OS, problem with boot

sKa

New Member


Messages: 19

Hi,

I have installed 2 disks. At ada0 is Windows 10, at ada1 is FreeBSD.
At the boot bootloader always run as first Windows.
I would run as first FreeBSD.
How I can configure bootloader for that?
Sorry for my English. It is not my native language.
Thanks for help
 

ShelLuser

Son of Beastie

Reaction score: 1,703
Messages: 3,516

I'm not sure if you should. See: FreeBSD's default bootloader only supports FreeBSD but no other operating systems.

Still, what you could try is changing the boot device in your BIOS (if supported). Some allow you to specify a boot device, then point it to the other disk and it would start with FreeBSD.

Though what I would do is add FreeBSD to the Windows bootmenu instead.
 

AlexanderProphet

Active Member

Reaction score: 31
Messages: 145

Hey,
When I used to use Windows Vista (about ten years ago) I used to use a proprietary app called EasyBCD that handled dual booting magically. It seems to be still available as freeware for non commercial use:

https://neosmart.net/EasyBCD/

I can’t tell you what the project is like now, however, as I don’t use Windows. But it was great ten years ago and made everything so easy.
 

roddierod

Aspiring Daemon

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Messages: 833

I would suggest that you use your system BIOS menu for any multiple disk setup. When you system is booting you should be able to get a boot menu or system menu. On my specific motherboard pressing F12 gives a menu of all the disks in my machine and I then just select which I want to boot. I have 4 different OSes on different disks and this is how I have been handling this for at least 5 or 6 years.
 
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sKa

New Member


Messages: 19

I would suggest that you use your system BIOS menu for any multiple disk setup. When you system is booting you should be able to get a boot menu or system menu. On my specific motherboard pressing F12 gives a menu of all the disks in my machine and I then just select which I want to boot. I have 4 different OSes on different disks and this is how I have been handling this for at least 5 or 6 years.
Hi,
Yes, I know about system menu via F12 button. But I want make FreeBSD first OS. Thanks.

Hey,
When I used to use Windows Vista (about ten years ago) I used to use a proprietary app called EasyBCD that handled dual booting magically. It seems to be still available as freeware for non commercial use:

https://neosmart.net/EasyBCD/

I can’t tell you what the project is like now, however, as I don’t use Windows. But it was great ten years ago and made everything so easy.
I'II try it. Thanks.
 

rewtkid

Member

Reaction score: 6
Messages: 68

I dual boot windows 10 and freebsd 12-release on my box. I installed them both to seperate disks using uefi / and gpt partitions. In my bios i go in the config and i can tell it which uefi devices to boot and in what order. If i want windows i press f8 for the boot menu otherwise it automatically goes in bsd. I did not install both windows and freebsd to the same EFI partition they each have their own and are seperate and on their own harddisk. I dont want windows touching freebsd with a broomstick. They each have their own efi partition on the harddisk they are installed at. look in your bios under boot. if you installed both bootloaders to the same efi menu you cannot change the order without editing the efi. Their is a program in windows called easy eufi utility you can use its free and i used it a few times look it up. it will do exactly what you want.
 

AlexanderProphet

Active Member

Reaction score: 31
Messages: 145

Isn’t the whole point of dual booting that you want a nice menu to come up - rather than tapping a key manically every time you turn your machine on?
 

ronaldlees

Aspiring Daemon

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Messages: 733

Isn’t the whole point of dual booting that you want a nice menu to come up - rather than tapping a key manically every time you turn your machine on?
Well, menus are nice, but I think the OP wanted the automagick sort of startup, with FreeBSD being the automatic default. The BIOS order does give you this - it's not necessary to hit a key each time.
 

rewtkid

Member

Reaction score: 6
Messages: 68

Isn’t the whole point of dual booting that you want a nice menu to come up - rather than tapping a key manically every time you turn your machine on?
Not for me. Not at all. Because then windows "updates" (aka breaks itself.) and takes your freebsd menu with it in my experience. I want them completely seperate. Pressing a single key once does not bother me, and I can choose like I am trying to explain to this person, what boots first by default with no effort by editing EFI menu. or the bios boot config either or.

Well, menus are nice, but I think the OP wanted the automagick sort of startup, with FreeBSD being the automatic default. The BIOS order does give you this - it's not necessary to hit a key each time.
He can get exactly the behavior he is looking for if he reads my post again.
 
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sKa

New Member


Messages: 19

Hi,
Success!
I dug deeper in BIOS options and solved problem.

Thanks for help.
 
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