Stupid company decisions

getopt

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 394
Messages: 602

Fighting stupidity is like tilting at windmills.

Stupidity is fueled by population growth.
No signs insight that it will diminish in our lifespan.
There have never been so many idiots on earth than today.
And that sentence will be true as long as population grows.

Our talent is not recognizing our very own stupidity.
As we cannot avoid stupidity all the time we try at least to hide and cover.
Reputation may be based on careful hiding.
 

sidetone

Daemon

Reaction score: 394
Messages: 1,094

Fighting stupidity is like tilting at windmills.

Stupidity is fueled by population growth.
No signs insight that it will diminish in our lifespan.
There have never been so many idiots on earth than today.
And that sentence will be true as long as population grows.

Our talent is not recognizing our very own stupidity.
As we cannot avoid stupidity all the time we try at least to hide and cover.
Reputation may be based on careful hiding.
I read something that they believe that high intelligence may have peaked in the 90's, and now they will remain about the same or decline on average compared to past generations.
It isn't at all clear to me that the machines in Microsoft's cloud that implement backup actually run Windows; I somewhat suspect that they actually use Linux. But it doesn't matter: as a user of OneDrive, one only communicates with an opaque machine using known RPCs, and one doesn't get the opportunity to know what OS the cloud servers are running; and their correct operation depends on many things other than the OS.

What is the risk here? That Microsoft loses the data? Possible, but in my opinion way less likely than losing the data if you build the backup system yourself. Given their scale, Microsoft (and Amazon and Google) is probably much better and finding and preventing bugs, and using redundancy to handle outages. There is another few risks. One is that Microsoft discontinues the service; in that case, I'm sure they will give ample opportunity to retrieve the data first. Or that Microsoft simply goes out business, which is fundamentally unimaginable in the short term.

There is a theoretical risk that Microsoft might take the data hostage, and refuse to allow reading it. I very much doubt this would happen, as the ensuing publicity and lawsuits would destroy them. And that risk also exists if you keep your data on-premises: what if the landlord refuses to let you enter into the building?

And if you really worry about Microsoft going under or stealing the data, then store redundant copies on Amazon and Google. For a cost increase of a factor of 1.5 (with a 2+p RAID encoding across the three cloud vendors), you get much better reliability, against a problem that probably doesn't exist in the first place.


Careful, now you are mixing in a different problem: privacy. You are worried that Microsoft might be able to inspect the data, or leak it to others. That's super easy to fix: encrypt it, and don't share the keys with Microsoft. Matter-of-fact, I think all major cloud storage vendors support a variety of encryption methods.
I was thinking of data being in one place, being a temptation to hackers outside of Microsoft's intentions. But you did say to encrypt it, which may work. Nothing on the Internet is safe from hackers, except possibly for encryption itself which theoretically couldn't be broken in a lifespan. Around that, they would try to go after data before it is encrypted or after it is decrypted.
 
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