Rumors of Oracle killing Solaris

I think these rumors are as old as the take-over itself. Ever since Oracle got its hands on Sun everything disappeared.
 
The big question is what does the closed source Solaris still have that you can't get elsewhere?
 
Well, now its quasi-official:
https://www.thelayoff.com/t/KTCW4qz

As Oracle is also just starting a witch hunt on customers who allegedly violated Java licenses [1] (maybe only in oracles sick, distorted view of licenses...), one may assume they are pretty much on their knees, grasping every straw they can get.

Overall Oracles constant and repeated misbehavior always made the Open Source projects stronger in the long run. So the latest events will surely further strengthen the illumos and FreeBSD community, especially because these are the only platforms where you find key Solaris technologies like ZFS or DTrace. And especially ZFS in a much more evolved, modern and healthier form, with all former lead-developers from Sun now working on OpenZFS on illumos or FreeBSD.


[1] http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/12/16/oracle_targets_java_users_non_compliance/
 
So the latest events will surely further strengthen the illumos and FreeBSD community, especially because these are the only platforms where you find key Solaris technologies like ZFS or DTrace. And especially ZFS in a much more evolved, modern and healthier form, with all former lead-developers from Sun now working on OpenZFS on illumos or FreeBSD.

Then I would say us and the FreeBSD foundation should be encouraging the Solaris fans to find a new home in FreeBSD. :)
 
Oracle practically killed off Solaris the very moment they took over. Back then my company had licensed Solaris and I myself had 2 personal licenses for Solaris (X86 & Sparc version) because I strongly believed in the product as well as in the company behind it.

So the first thing which happened after Oracle had taken over was that I saw the subscription costs go up threefold (from approx. E200 to E 799,-) whilst we also got a whole lot less in return. SunSolve for example was already long gone even though it provided some invaluable resources for system administrators.

That was basically the main reason why I started using FreeBSD, I literally switched from Solaris. It's also why I keep on using ipf to this day and age and why I seriously enjoy working with the FreeBSD package manager. And why I, at first, was very skeptical of pkgng but really came to enjoy it. And then there's ZFS of course.

I know this is all semantics and such, but for me Solaris more or less lives on in FreeBSD and not so much the open source variants and all. For my feeling the torch was passed on when Sun helped out FreeBSD to port the ZFS engine into the kernel. I know this may sound silly and basically my opinion has little value, but it is how I somewhat approach it knowing that it is a tad silly ;)
 
That would be me :D

Presently my firewall runs FreeBSD on separate hardware and I have three domains running on SmartOS in zones and a mail server running on OpenBSD in KVM on SmartOS.

My goal (and I'm being lazy) is to move the firewall onto the same server and rid myself of the separate firewall and a switch.

I am trying to decide whether to use FreeBSD and put the firewall into bhyve and the web servers and mail server into VNET jails. The other option is to use SmartOS.

There are pros and cons for each. For example, with SmartOS I don't need to build a kernel to get jails with their own network stack. On the other hand, Joyent already publishes a FreeBSD image which I'd use, but it has to be downloaded, so if I ever had to rebuild from scratch it is the chicken and egg; although I can create my own dataset and manifest.

I keep going back and forth. Someday I may make a choice.:confused:


Made this post from Jonathan Perkin spring to mind https://gist.github.com/jperkin/7717d3e84e93885ab14da3bce3039f4b

I've been quite tempted to do something similar.
 
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