Solved Remote desktop question

mefizto

Well-Known Member

Thanks: 6
Messages: 372

#1
Greetings all,

I am concerned that my FreeBSD laptop develops some display issues. Before/if it gets worse, I would like to set up another laptop dual booting OpenBSD and Windows 7 to run GUI based applications locally. In the past I experimented with X-forwarding, but it was rather slow even on a local network due to, as I understand, limitations of the X protocol.

Does anyone have a practical experience with any alternative applications, preferably both for OpenBSD and Windows 7?

Kindest regards,

M
 

aragats

Aspiring Daemon

Thanks: 349
Messages: 875

#2
VNC is much more usable compared to X forwarding. In FreeBSD we have net/tigervnc and net/tigervnc. There exist several other variants for other OSs (including these two).
I use VNC connection to computers in other countries, it works very well with acceptable lag.
 
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mefizto

Well-Known Member

Thanks: 6
Messages: 372

#4
Hi Aragats,

first, thank you for the answer.

I have been doing some reading to try to understand the concepts. As I understand it there are two possibilities: 1. run an X-server at the source computer and mirror the X-server display at the target computer, and 2. invoke a GUI application on the source computer and have it rendered at the target computer. I believe VNC/RDP does the former, X-forwarding does the latter.

If the above is correct, I will need to finish installing x-server at the FreeBSD computer to be able to use net/tigervnc or - I believe that you meant - net/tightvnc. What is the difference between those two and the net/x11vnc?

In your experience, which one would you recommend?

Kindest regards,

M
 

aragats

Aspiring Daemon

Thanks: 349
Messages: 875

#5
If the above is correct, I will need to finish installing x-server at the FreeBSD computer to be able to use net/tigervnc or - I believe that you meant - net/tightvnc. What is the difference between those two and the net/x11vnc?
The difference is that x11vnc "broadcasts" your real X server, for example, I use it on remote computers to assist users. In contrast, running tiger/tight or whatever VNC server means that you do not need to start (and even to install) a real X server. Graphical applications you launch will not be visible on your computer's screen, but will be accessible via a VNC client on another computer.
 
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