NFS file locking questions

puppyboy

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I'm wanting to use lockd on my nfs server, but first I'm trying to make sure it will do exactly what I'm thinking it will do. I haven't been able to find a good concise writeup on it and the manpage isn't too helpful, so I thought I'd ask the forum.

The setup:
*NFS server and two NFS clients with their shares mounted at all times (SERVER, CLIENT0, CLIENT1
*One service on the server which has to be able to read any file on the share at any given time
*The same service also needs to be able to create new files in the directory at any given time.

So, what I am expecting to happen with lockd is that I could have any file on the mount open on CLIENT0, and SERVER and CLIENT1 cannot make edits to that open file. Both, however, can interact with file as read-only while CLIENT0 has it open. Meaning, the service on SERVER can read whatever it needs to read, and CLIENT1 can simultaneously just view the contents.

So to summarize, my basic understanding is that the files all just sit there on the server, and whoever opens them first locks it for editing, but anyone can still read the file (although without any changes being made by the opener). Is this correct?
 

SirDice

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Locks need to be applied, just opening a file doesn't lock anything. And as far as I understood it it depends on the type of lock. There are shared and exclusive locks. See flopen(3) and flock(2). Basically what rpc.lockd(8) does is make file locking work consistently across NFS shares.
 
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puppyboy

puppyboy

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Okay so that was not at all what I was picturing

The initial problem that I'm trying to solve here is that on the client (Linux), when I try to mount a FreeBSD nfs share it tells me something like "server does not support file locking" or something like that (I'm at work and don't have the exact message). So it won't mount unless I specify the nolock option with my mount command. I'd just assumed that it was referring to a locking feature to prevent corruption.

For shared directories that need to be accessed by services on the service, I just mount as ro which is good enough my need because the client doesn't need to be able to write to these directories anyway. But I would like to figure out what I need to do to not have to mount with nolock in the first place, just because I don't like needing to use options that I don't really need.
 
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