My understanding of the history of modern computing.

Chipper8827

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#1
If you trace the Distributions all the way back to the 1970's and the days of Mainframes and Mulltix which was forked by Kennith Thomas, Dennis Richie and there fellow Researchers at Bell Laboratories forking multix into Unix which then was forked into Solaris and the MTI/Berkeley Software Distributions and thenj in the early 1990's Linux Torvalds forked Bell Laboratories Unix while completing hi graduate degree at the University of Helsinki in Finland and the GNU Linux kernel was born and as any one who is computer savy knows mist have a kernel before you can build the user-land and its related command Line Inter Face (CLI) or Graphical User Interface (GUI) let alone fork linux into Debian, Suse,Slack Ware Debian or even Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL let alone Oracle Linux , By the way, Oracle acquired Sun Micro Systems the originator and patent holder of Solaris when they bought Sun Micro Systems and plans to end of life cycle (EOL) Solaris and Java by the mid 2020's as html 5 has been cutting into Java's market share.
 

ShelLuser

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#2
Your understanding is quite off. For example: I wouldn't try to compare a markup language with a programming language because it makes your comment look really silly.
 

ralphbsz

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#3
You forgot about Maurice Wilkes ... OK, that was just a joke.

Everything you wrote above is wrong. Modern computing existed long before 1970. There was a lot of computers (different from mainframes and from multics) long before that. It's Multics. It's Ken Thompson and Dennis Ritchie. Unix is not a fork of Multics. Solaris came way way later, there were a lot of other Sun operating systems long before that (so many that Sun's zoo of OSes became the butt of jokes, for a while people were joking that there was a special version called "SunOS LMPP for people with left-handed mouse and parallel printer). It's MIT, not MTI. The software distribution is Berkeley, MIT had nothing to do with it. Linux is not a fork of Unix. Linus did not get a graduate degree while writing Linux. The Linux kernel existed long before it became Gnu; in those days the Gnu kernel was still Hurd. And now I run out of patience with fixing individual mistakes.

And what the dickens does HTML5 have to do with Java? That's not like comparing apples and oranges, that's like comparing apples with elephants.
 

phoenix

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#4
UNIX is not a fork of Multics.

Solaris is not a fork of UNIX.

BSD is not a fork of UNIX.

Linux is not a fork of UNIX.

Java has not been end-of-lifed, although Oracle has given it over to a separate foundation to develop going forward.

Do a Google search for "graphical family tree for UNIX" and you'll get a giant line graph showing how all the pieces branched off from and joined to each other over the years.
 

ralphbsz

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#5
Java has not been end-of-lifed, ...
Very good point, didn't catch that. A friend of mine works in the Java group at Oracle (formerly Sun), and he says that the Java group is hiring like mad, unlike most other parts of Oracle, which are reducing staff. Java is definitely not end of life.
 

SirDice

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#6
thenj in the early 1990's Linux Torvalds forked Bell Laboratories Unix while completing hi graduate degree at the University of Helsinki in Finland and the GNU Linux kernel was born
Linus didn't fork anything, the Linux kernel was written from scratch.
 
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