My home network topology

kpa

Beastie's Twin

Thanks: 1,777
Messages: 6,287

#2
I would do away with the router that you have in middle of the picture and instead add one more NIC to the firewall and connect the server to that extra NIC and create a DMZ for the server that way. That would also remove the requirement of the server to act as a router or a bridge because only one of its NICs would be needed.
 

kpa

Beastie's Twin

Thanks: 1,777
Messages: 6,287

#3
If you want further separation between your clients the answer is the same as above, more NICs to the firewall.
 
OP
OP
TomHsiung

TomHsiung

Active Member

Thanks: 6
Messages: 134

#5
Actually, there is no a real hardware firewall. I set the server as the firewall, and router. I could control the traffic or do some investigation if I set my server as the router. Also, the server's services is directly exposed to the WAN, so it is not needed to use port forwarding to access the server from WAN.
 

kpa

Beastie's Twin

Thanks: 1,777
Messages: 6,287

#6
Well, firewalling and routing belongs to the edge so if at all possible look into getting a proper hardware firewall. You can build one yourself using FreeBSD or use a ready made system like pfSense.
 

balanga

Daemon

Thanks: 95
Messages: 2,338

#9
Usually a satellite dish is connected to a pole with an azimuth adjustable bracket.
Perhaps you meant "What do you connect your LNB to?"
I was going by the labels on the diagram. Didn't notice LNB :).

Talking about satellite dishes, is it possible to access the Internet via satellite? I'm sure it is but how would I go about finding a satellite ISP?
 

leebrown66

Well-Known Member

Thanks: 124
Messages: 386

#10
If one of those switches is VLAN capable and has enough ports, I would get rid of both the router and right hand switch. Server is/would be your router/firewall. One VLAN for the laptops, a different VLAN for the WiFi.
 
OP
OP
TomHsiung

TomHsiung

Active Member

Thanks: 6
Messages: 134

#11
I really appreciate that you were reading at the packet and frame layer to understand NAT.
I took the easy way out and use pfSense.
Like I mentioned before, you can find really inexpensive Atoms/Celerons that you can add a 4 port Intel Gigabit adapter.
That should give you 5 or 6 ports to use. One for WAN the rest your LAN.

I prefer dedicated firewall appliances with an X86 chip.
Perhaps look at PCEngines APU2. The whole rig costs under $150 for a dedicated headless appliance.
They sell it as a kit and they also will assemble and test for 5-10 bucks more. Really nice people to deal with.
Thank you for your suggestion. However, have you noticed the network printer? It is one of the issues I have to use a commercial BSD. The available driver for that network printer only supports Win and the commercial BSD. If I want to print something remotely (from WAN), I have to use that BSD (I use CLI to print something like screen output directly to remote printer).

PS: Actually, I have tested remote printing. I was at outside and able to access the printer via WAN.
 
OP
OP
TomHsiung

TomHsiung

Active Member

Thanks: 6
Messages: 134

#12
Talking about satellite dishes, is it possible to access the Internet via satellite? I'm sure it is but how would I go about finding a satellite ISP?
It's probable I think. Satellite use radio wave (including light) to transfer packets. The most obvious example is that NASA could remotely accessed the Pathfinder who was as far as at Mars.
 
Top