Lol I Installed OpenBSD over FreeBSD :3

So there I was, trying to make room for NetBSD, when suddenly... BOOM!!! :3 FreeBSD's USB Live Image hard rebooted my Laptop, erased my UFS Partition, and basically rendered FreeBSD unbootable, with all my Files gone..... :( Well, I already had most of them on an External Hard Drive..... :3 It was almost 6:00 A.M. I believe, when suddenly I had a bright idea..... "Imma install OpenBSD!!!11" :3 So I installed OpenBSD, and, being itself, it gobbled up all my Partitions, but I didn't care..... :3 I wanted some action, and boy did I get it..... :3 I had initially tried to leave room for FreeBSD, but then OpenBSD kept complaining, saying that it had no space left or somethin' like that when I tried to install some Programs..... :3 So I repeated that whole GLORIOUS process again, this time making sure I installed everything BEFORE I started Xorg, to see if the space issue would arise, and, lo1 and behold, it didn't..... :3 man(1), was I pleased!..... :D I didn't have room on this Netbook's small integrated SSD for two OS's, so I stuck with OpenBSD..... :3 Oh yeah, I stayed up all night..... :D
 
I just wanna' say that I plan on installing FreeBSD when I get another cheap Netbook..... :3 I haven't betrayed Daemon, don't you worry!..... :3
 
I didn't have room on this Netbook's small integrated SSD for two OS's, so I stuck with OpenBSD..... :3 Oh yeah, I stayed up all night..... :D

If you can run FreeBSD you won't have any trouble with OpenBSD. There are just a few slight differences in everyday operation.

Instead of using the FreeBSD command # freebsd-update fetch it's # syspatch with OpenBSD and should be done right away.

Mounting a USB stick is done differently. Create a folder named /mnt/sd1i and use the command:

Code:
# mount -v -t msdos /dev/sd1i /mnt/sd1i
# umount -v -t msdos /dev/sd1i /mnt/sd1i
The syntax for the OpenBSD pf ruleset is slightly different but I use my basic FreeBSD ruleset, which I have posted elsewhere, with OpenBSD. The main difference I see is that the outbound rule syntax is different.

On FreeBSD I use:

Code:
### Keep and modulate state of outbound tcp, udp and icmp traffic
pass out on $ext_if proto { tcp, udp, icmp } from any to any modulate state
On OpenBSD it's done like this:

Code:
### Keep and modulate state of outbound tcp, udp and icmp traffic
pass out on egress proto { tcp, udp, icmp } from any to any modulate state
I tried using ports the first time I tried OpenBSD, and just like they said it might, it filled up my directory so now I use pkg with OpenBSD.
 
If you can run FreeBSD you won't have any trouble with OpenBSD. There are just a few slight differences in everyday operation.

Instead of using the FreeBSD command # freebsd-update fetch it's # syspatch with OpenBSD and should be done right away.

Mounting a USB stick is done differently. Create a folder named /mnt/sd1i and use the command:

Code:
# mount -v -t msdos /dev/sd1i /mnt/sd1i
# umount -v -t msdos /dev/sd1i /mnt/sd1i
The syntax for the OpenBSD pf ruleset is slightly different but I use my basic FreeBSD ruleset, which I have posted elsewhere, with OpenBSD. The main difference I see is that the outbound rule syntax is different.

On FreeBSD I use:

Code:
### Keep and modulate state of outbound tcp, udp and icmp traffic
pass out on $ext_if proto { tcp, udp, icmp } from any to any modulate state
On OpenBSD it's done like this:

Code:
### Keep and modulate state of outbound tcp, udp and icmp traffic
pass out on egress proto { tcp, udp, icmp } from any to any modulate state
I tried using ports the first time I tried OpenBSD, and just like they said it might, it filled up my directory so now I use pkg with OpenBSD.

Thanks for the tips, good sir!..... :3 I should probably run syspatch right now!..... :3 Also, I still wanna use FreeBSD and Linux, and when I get a Hard Drive for the second Drive spot in this Laptop of mine, I plan on putting FreeBSD on a Partition, then making a separate one that's UFS, so both OpenBSD and FreeBSD can share Programming projects I work on (all Open Source, of course..... :D )
 
Yes, you should if you want to continue running OpenBSD. There are 26 security patches available for 6.1.
Yeah..... I did, but now I'm sticking to running FreeBSD and Linux..... :) I'll save OpenBSD for when I get another Machine..... :) FreeBSD is SO easy to get alongside Linux..... :D
 
RedPhoenix Do you use some kind of a smart editor that automatically appends ':3' or a smiley to every sentence you write? So many of them that they slow down my reading. :)
Oh, I'm sorry..... :) I just try to show that I'm a friendly person..... Over the Internet, things could be easily misinterpreted..... :D I'll try to use less of them..... Sorry!..... ^^
 
Maybe..... Security-wise, you should stick to the latest, or maybe the last Version before that one..... :)

I would like to tinker with OpenBSD but from what I can see they dropped linux emulation and there is 0 support for wine.
You do not need these things obviously but still fun to make things work.
 
As is OpenBSD.
Really.....? :3 I managed to install them both, but Linux kept complaining about improperly nested Partitions..... :\ Also, the UEFI didn't show OpenBSD, just Linux..... :3 But FreeBSD showed up alongside Linux, when I had FreeBSD installed..... :D
 
I would like to tinker with OpenBSD but from what I can see they dropped linux emulation and there is 0 support for wine.
You do not need these things obviously but still fun to make things work.
Yeah, it would be easier to tinker, as you said, as well as run Windows Programs like Brutal Doom..... :)
 
I think he's talking about Dual Booting, something I've been unable to do with OpenBSD and Linux, particularly..... :)
Originally I ran a Puppy Linux CD (liveboot) and installed grub4dos bootloader (BIOS) to HDD using that and have stuck with it ever since.

I have a full install of Debian in the first partition (ext3 format) along with grub4dos's menu.lst that contains ...
Code:
# menu.lst
color white/blue black/cyan white/black cyan/black
#splashimage=/tempest.xpm
timeout 3
default 1

title Debian
find --set-root /menu.lst
configfile /boot/grub/menu-mine.lst
commandline

title BSD sda3
root (hd0,2)
makeactive
chainloader +1
boot

title OpenBSD
  root (hd0,3)
  makeactive
  chainloader +1

title Xenial Pup 64
find --set-root /xenial64/woofd-flag
kernel /xenial64/vmlinuz pmedia=ataflash psubdir=xenial64 pfix=fsck pupsfs=sda3:/xenial64/puppy_xenialpup64_7.0.8.4.sfs zdrv=sda3:/xenial64/zdrv_xenialpup64_7.0.8.4.sfs
initrd /xenial64/initrd.gz
sda2 is also ext3 ... which is handy as freebsd can rw to that (but as though ext2 i.e. no journalling) whilst it can also be started up as though ext4 within Linux. I also use that to store/boot other Puppy Linux versions.
sda3 is my FreeBSD install
sda4 is OpenBSD

My primary default boot choice is now FreeBSD. Intend to wipe the OpenBSD as that doesn't work well with my nvidia graphics card and will probably turn that partition over to a second admin type freebsd boot (for making backups using mksquashfs (squashfs-tools) of all the other partitions in readiness for copying off to removable storage).

I don't do Windows, so have none of the complexities involved with it deciding that it 'owns' you and your hardware.
 
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