Is desktop-installer good for a newbie ?

Hello, as a newbie who wants to jump in the FreeBSD world, i wanted to know if desktop-installer is good for quickly install a DE and quickly configure the system.


Thanks !
 

zirias@

Developer
I never used it. Assuming it works as advertised, it is
  • "good" as you will quickly have the DE you want up and running.
  • "not good" as you won't learn how the things work on FreeBSD.
So, it's ultimately your choice what you consider more important.
 
Yeah you right, i guess i could try desktop-installer, but its kinda bad since i won't learn a lot about how to install DEs in FreeBSD.
 
Try to install, search, read, delete and re-install... Better than waiting for answers in forum.
 
Last time I looked at it it worked pretty good, but that was on a pretty generic system with Intel graphics. But as pointed out it's not really that hard to install something. There are meta-packages for most of the popular DEs (KDE5, gnome) and lots of choices for old fashioned window managers.
 
Ah ok i'll try, right now im having troubles with GRUB detecting FreeBSD on EndeavourOS.
 

zirias@

Developer
Did you consider virtualization instead of multi-booting? Then you could use FreeBSD's native bootloader instead of grub, which is a lot easier.

It of course depends on your usecase. But if you have one "main" OS (which you use most of the time), and one other you need for experimenting or for compatibility with some specific application etc ... it can often make sense to just install the "main" OS on the bare metal and the other one in a virtual machine...
 
If you can/will share your hardware: motherboard (is it UEFI capable*?), CPU & hdd(s) perhaps the forum community can give you better specific advice as to viable options. In the end you can make your own informed choice. Depending on the CPU, 4GB is quite adequate for a FreeBSD OS with a (non-overloaded) DE; however—if possible—an extra 4GB will give you a lot more options.

___
* that could ease your booting install options.
 
Did you consider virtualization instead of multi-booting? Then you could use FreeBSD's native bootloader instead of grub, which is a lot easier.

It of course depends on your usecase. But if you have one "main" OS (which you use most of the time), and one other you need for experimenting or for compatibility with some specific application etc ... it can often make sense to just install the "main" OS on the bare metal and the other one in a virtual machine...
In my case the host os i windows 10 Professional as I have 32gb of ram and Windows 10Home restricts you to a poultry 16GB of ram maximum. As for the Virtualization aspect of the equation I use Vm Ware Workstation, although prior to purchasing Vmware Workstation I was using Oracle Virtual box.
 
I have used desktop-installer numerous times to install a DE for desktop systems. I have had very positive experiences with it installing XFCE or Mate. The one time I tried Cinnamon, the system was not usable afterwards - but Cinnamon on FreeBSD was very outdated at that point in time, it might be better now.
 
I set up my first FreeBSD desktop this past January and hadn't found desktop-installer in all my googling; thanks for asking about it here.

For what it's worth, the FreeBSD Foundation has a tutorial called Installing a Desktop Environment on FreeBSD that takes you through the installation and configuration of XFCE. It was straightforward for me, and since you report having experience with Linux, it might work for you, too. I just worked through it after doing a fresh install of 13.0.
 
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