Installing FreeBSD 1.0

balanga

Son of Beastie

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After finding a copy of FreeBSD 1.0 on CD a year ago, I thought I'd have to try installing it, but ISTR that I would need to use a computer with a SCSI CDROM player to install it from CD, so I'm wondering how I can install it...

Looking at the layout of the files on the CD, there is a /filesys/ directory which appears to contain the root filesystem. I was wondering if I might create a partition somewhere and copy this directory to it. My question is, what filesytem would I need to create (maybe ufs1 if it's possible) and to find a boot loader... Would a freebsd-boot partition be sufficient or maybe Grub?...
 

covacat

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install it as a guest os in virtualbox/vmware/etc first
probably none of the current hardware will work anyway
 

ralphbsz

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I have a SCSI CDROM player i the basement. I need it for installing software on my VAXes; they need to read CDs with 512-byte sectors (all the rest of the world uses 2048-byte sectors on CD), and very few CDROM players are capable of that.

Now, a SCSI card that works with that? No idea where to find that.
 

shkhln

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The most interesting thing about this thread is that apparently in XenForo's opinion for unlogged users Saturday comes at 22:00 UTC. (No, these labels are timezone aware, UTC is simply the default setting.) I have nothing to say on the topic, as usual.
 

bsduck

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what filesytem would I need to create (maybe ufs1 if it's possible)
You can indeed create a UFS1 file system with newfs -O 1

But pay attention: UFS1 only support dates up to 2038-01-18, so expect troubles in case you plan to run this for two decades :)
 

SirDice

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You might want to try 2.2.2 instead, I do believe that'll work with an IDE controller. If I recall correctly you need to create two floppy images, one to boot from and another with the root filesystem. From there you can do the install. Speaking of which, see if you can enable NE1000 network adapter, it should support that one. Then you could do a network install.
 
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balanga

Son of Beastie

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You can indeed create a UFS1 file system with newfs -O 1

But pay attention: UFS1 only support dates up to 2038-01-18, so expect troubles in case you plan to run this for two decades :)
To be quite honest I think this user will be long past EOL when that happens :)

Incidentally what is the significance of that date? Does it have something to do with the alotted field size used somewhere for storing the number of seconds since 1st Jan 1970?
 

SirDice

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Incidentally what is the significance of that date? Does it have something to do with the alotted field size used somewhere for storing the number of seconds since 1st Jan 1970?
Yep. It's a 32 bit signed number.


It's a 64 bit signed number nowadays. So it'll wrap around at 20 times the current age of the universe (assuming the age of the universe is around 13-14 billion years old).
 

neel

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I certainly responded late, but I have gotten to install FreeBSD 2.x in PCem. Getting X working was another story, however.

For ancient OSes, PCem is your friend, it is in the Ports tree (UPDATE: For 11.x and 12.x amd64 ONLY) but if that doesn't work you could try Wine and i386-wine-devel.

I could get X11 and Mozilla/Netscape working on 4.x.
 
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