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I am new to BSD

8bitGlitch

New Member


Messages: 4

#1
Folks,
I want to say hello, and this is my first time using and trying a BSD system. I have 2 years of experience supporting Red Hat/Centos; however, I was hearing great things about FreeBSD and the community, so I wanted to try it out.

I would be grateful for any: insight, tips, books or other sources to learn BSD.

Thank you
 

Maelstorm

Active Member

Thanks: 91
Messages: 244

#5
Ah, fresh meat.

Seriously though. The FreeBSD Handbook and the website are quite good. The documentation is good. FreeBSD is a unix operating system, so your experience in Linux will mostly transfer over. However, we do not use systemd which CentOS and RedHat use. We use the init system. Some of the command line tools are a little different, but there is always man to help you out. And don't forget to check out the /usr/ports tree for additional software. You can use the pkg command to install pre-compiled versions from the ports tree.
 

PacketMan

Aspiring Daemon

Thanks: 104
Messages: 767

#6
Welcome welcome, and get yourself a decent little box and just go nuts on it. Install stuff, try to figure out why its not working, maybe a mistake you made, and so on. Then when you are stuck use this forum to ask questions, but remember you have to help us help you.

ports-mgmt/portmaster is a tool to install ports (FreeBSD language for programs/applications). I did that for a year or so and things often went off the rails for me, because I didn't do something right. It was a great way to learn. Later when you want a more stable machine, and want to enjoy trying to get more ports up an running in a more stable manner, then consider switching to another ports mgmt tool ports-mgmt/synth. Might I also suggest farting around first with just console output, and then a wee bit later try deploying Xorg graphics and even some sort of desktop install. Desktops require a supported video card, and the other expected horsepower. I was like you a few years ago, actually worse since I was not even a Linux guy, and it wasn't long before I had my household completely free of MS Windows. My first home server box has served me incredibly well, rock solid well, and now I am in the process of trying to finish up the selection of components for my 'next generation' brand new server. My first one cost me $40 bucks, this one will be $800 or so. Gonna try and get some decent virtulization going later this year.

And oh, make lots of notes:
/home/FreeBSD_notes/

:D
 

8bitGlitch

New Member


Messages: 4

#8
Thank you for a warm welcome...


I am not sure what the boot splash screen is trying to inform me of.

What is the difference between the following at the splash boot screen specifically option 1 and 2:
1. Boot multi user
2. Boot single user
3. Escape to loader prompt
4. Reboot
 

SirDice

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator

Thanks: 5,476
Messages: 25,636

#9
Option 1 is the default, it's how it normally boots. Which means everything is started, daemons, network, filesystems, etc. Single user mode only starts the kernel and has the root filesystem mounted read-only. Nothing else is started or enabled.
 

8bitGlitch

New Member


Messages: 4

#10
Option 1 is the default, it's how it normally boots. Which means everything is started, daemons, network, filesystems, etc. Single user mode only starts the kernel and has the root filesystem mounted read-only. Nothing else is started or enabled.
I was just playing around with the two different options - and wanted to see - if I logged in as option 2 would I be able to see user directories and files; however, I was not able to see files and directories in user's home directory. Why is that? I am just 'kicking the tires' sort of speak right now trying to get oriented with the system.

Thank you
 

SirDice

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator

Thanks: 5,476
Messages: 25,636

#11
if I logged in as option 2 would I be able to see user directories and files; however, I was not able to see files and directories in user's home directory. Why is that?
In single user mode only the root filesystem is mounted. If your home directories are on a separate filesystem it won't be mounted and the files contained within that filesystem aren't available.