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Hello, Greetings & Self-Introduction Thread

Trihexagonal

Daemon

Thanks: 497
Messages: 1,017

I read a lot from your forum and wish sometime in the future I could test FreeBSD in Virtualbox, right now I can’t because my cpu too old, it’s just not support hardware virtualization :(
Lack of formal education doesn't make you any less able to run a BSD box. ;) I'm self-taught when it comes to FreeBSD, and all things computer related TBH. I don't even know anybody who runs Linux.

Why not take the plunge and install it to your HDD? You didn't say anything about machine specs but I have an i386 FreeBSD box with Intel Dual Core T2060 @ 1.6GHZ and 2GB RAM. It was what I used for years and is still of use.

FreeBSD is not Linux, but I can get you to a fully functional x11-wm/fluxbox desktop if you look in the How-To section for my tutorial.
 
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giahung1997

Guest


Lack of formal education doesn't make you any less able to run a BSD box. ;) I'm self-taught when it comes to FreeBSD, and all things computer related TBH. I don't even know anybody who runs Linux.

Why not take the plunge and install it to your HDD? You didn't say anything about machine specs but I have an i386 FreeBSD box with Intel Dual Core T2060 @ 1.6GHZ and 2GB RAM. It was what I used for years and is still of use.

FreeBSD is not Linux, but I can get you to a fully functional x11-wm/fluxbox desktop if you look in the How-To section for my tutorial.
My computer info:



With my current knowledge I would like to use something like Ubuntu or MX. I don't have other ready to connect to the Internet devices (I'm using Nokia dumb phone here, no smartphone) so it's too risky to try on bare metal. I will have to write down many parts of the handbook to paper (again no printer or smartphone) and if something unexpected happen I'm no way to get my ready to connect to the Internet computer back. I have two usb, one for data only (50% usage) and a cheap China ones to dd iso image to. It's too tricky :D
 

CraigHB

Member

Thanks: 25
Messages: 95

… until it switched to SystemD.
Hello giahung1997

Yes it was SystemD that pushed me over the edge with Linux as well. Though it wasn't just that. My old Debian distro I had been using for years became seriously convoluted and chaotic. It was locking me into a certain way of doing things instead of allowing me to do things the way I want. FreeBSD is the opposite, it's highly flexible and simple allowing me to do things however I please.
 
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giahung1997

Guest


Your computer specs are for all purposes the same as mine.
I don't think so. I've tried to install GNOME3 alongside with Debian 9 netinstall and it lag like hell. Even with MXLinux17 now, my Firefox 58 very lag when I writing my answer to you.
 
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giahung1997

Guest


Hello giahung1997

Yes it was SystemD that pushed me over the edge with Linux as well. Though it wasn't just that. My old Debian distro I had been using for years became seriously convoluted and chaotic. It was locking me into a certain way of doing things instead of allowing me to do things the way I want. FreeBSD is the opposite, it's highly flexible and simple allowing me to do things however I please.
I don't care about that much, I hate SystemD because it caused my computer unusable, just hanging. I've no idea about freedom of choice, instead I like only one best way to do things well, rather.
 

Trihexagonal

Daemon

Thanks: 497
Messages: 1,017

I don't think so. I've tried to install GNOME3 alongside with Debian 9 netinstall and it lag like hell. Even with MXLinux17 now, my Firefox 58 very lag when I writing my answer to you.
Yes, the only difference in what I'm now and yours is mine has a Intel Core2 Duo CPU T7300 @ 2.00GHz and yours is an E7200 @ 2.54GHZ, same amount of RAM in yours and mine..

I run x11-wm/fluxbox on all my machines. It's more lightweight than Gnome with less dependenices.

Start there.
 

geheimnisse

New Member

Thanks: 3
Messages: 11

Yes, the only difference in what I'm now and yours is mine has a Intel Core2 Duo CPU T7300 @ 2.00GHz and yours is an E7200 @ 2.54GHZ, same amount of RAM in yours and mine..

I run x11-wm/fluxbox on all my machines. It's more lightweight than Gnome with less dependenices.

Start there.
While I use openbox on my desktop, I've found it's loads easier to use a tiling WM on a laptop, like i3wm. No touchpad resizing and stuff. Plus it has native support for showing battery life and stuff without running a third-party applet or obsessively checking apm in an xterm

I'm just guessing giahung1997 has a laptop because of the screen rez, intel graphics, etc.
 

CraigHB

Member

Thanks: 25
Messages: 95

About window managers, fvwm is old as the mountains and I've been using it about as long. They've kept it current and I like it more than ever now. I've never been interested in a desktop environment, kind of goes against the way of doing things with Unix. There's not much you can't do with a good window manager. The only real difference is you have to install basic desktop utilities yourself instead of getting things bundled in a whole package.
 

Beno Kurniawan

New Member

Thanks: 4
Messages: 14

Hi all, please apology for late in introducing myself. My name is Beno and I was just an ordinary business person. I might didn't have knowledge about computer as deep as most of this forum members. It was fun and sometimes get me a confusion to read all the thread as they are very technically intended for such a "power user", but generaly speaking, I enjoyed it much to be here, in this forum. The members and forum moderator are very helpful.

I started to switch to Unix-like systems roughly 2 weeks right before Wannacry attacks, and I glad, I made the right decision. Starting with Ubuntu as my stepping-stone later on I tried lots of Linux distro. The deeper I learn, I started my journey to find an enlightement and find the truth that BSD is the direct descendant of Unix.

I previously tried to install FreeBSD on my daily production laptop, but then realized that my knowledge not yet there to have all functions needed works flawlessly. Now I have run TrueOS on my bare metal to keep my daily jobs done and FreeBSD in a Virtualbox to learn and experimenting.

Please apology if there were my posts or questions in this forum which you thought are stupid posts or questions. Its all because I still learning and want to build my entire system in a bare metal with vanilla FreeBSD. Thanks and have a wonderfull weekend.
 

Chipper8827

Member

Thanks: 6
Messages: 34

As a kid of 7yrs old I started out tearing apart vintage 286,386 and 486 model doss based machines. Then by the age of 10-13 years old I was beyond fed up with Windows crashing constantly, and turned to Linux which eventually led me down the Path to FreeBSD 9.X release. By my early college days I was head over heals for the “true Unix” feel of FreeBSD, I had already managed to get a budget Lenovo laptop running a fully operational Xwindows Environment backed by a NVIDIA graphics processing unit.
 

tzj

New Member


Messages: 2

Hello all,

I am a long-time multi-OS user (primarily Windows and Linux, and now macOS as my main OS for the last couple of years), and it's only by chance that I happened to be drawn into the world of BSD. I had had experiences with different UNIXes (and UNIX-like OSes), but maybe I got spoilt over time by the ease (and frustration) of using Ubuntu.

To cut a long story short, I had recently got hold of some software of interest to me that would only run on FreeBSD (386) and so I decided to create a FreeBSD VM rather than wasting time making it work on Linux. Since it had been some time since I had last touched FreeBSD (or was it OpenBSD? I cannot remember exactly), I was a bit apprehensive since a lot of people online seemed to portray it as a very hard system to even install, let alone make usable.

Of course, they couldn't have been any more wrong! I managed to not only install it, but also configure it enough to be able to work on my project with zero problems! All the information that I needed was found in these forums (via Google search primarily, and that's what enticed me to join the forums here). The handbook is also extremely useful, and I should enjoy tinkering and learning more about the system as time goes on.

In any case, to be honest, I really don't know how to describe it, but compared to my experience on Ubuntu (which I have used for quite a few years now), everything seems to just.. work! And not only work, but work smoothly, and those parts that are alien to me, the descriptions and steps seem rather intuitive. I am a bit amazed and pleasantly surprised to be honest. I can't say for sure now, but perhaps over time I'll move over from Ubuntu completely over to FreeBSD. Too early to say for sure, but in any case, just wanted to say thanks for the wonderful handbook and forum, guys.

Cheers!
 

tempest766

Member

Thanks: 17
Messages: 83

About window managers, fvwm is old as the mountains and I've been using it about as long. They've kept it current and I like it more than ever now. I've never been interested in a desktop environment, kind of goes against the way of doing things with Unix. There's not much you can't do with a good window manager. The only real difference is you have to install basic desktop utilities yourself instead of getting things bundled in a whole package.
I agree on all counts. When I try to take a new release of Fedora Linux and put it on my workstation it takes me literally two months to strip all the crap out of it they've pushed down my throat, and with the later releases there are things I cannot get rid of at all like systemd and pulseaudio. That's why I'm going back to my UNIX roots and trying to migrate back to BSD. Well, also Linux has been made totally unsuitable for embedded systems in recent years and I do more embedded programming than enterprise stuff.

We need to spread the love with fvwm. I've been using it since the 90s and honestly don't see anything else working as well with such a lite footprint.
 

ccregor

New Member


Messages: 1

Hi All!

I'm getting back into BSD. I discovered FreeBSD back around '99 and haven't really used it since. However, now that bhyve is in a usable state and heck even ported to OS/X I've just redone my CentOS VMHost as a FreeBSD 11.1 VMHost. The plunge has begun!!!

I've already made it crash once which I was unhappy with. I was console connected to a freshly made Debian VM over nmdm0 and did a bhyve --destroy... System dead, can't even switch to different tty, no capslock lights, no ~CTRL+D. Haven't looked into if magic sysrq exists in BSD, so maybe coulda salvaged it. Soooo bhyve just for my home server for now. Also I have no real need to run bhyve with stdio or nmdm, as long as I gots SSH, I'm happy. But no console may be a bad idea, we'll have to see.

I absolutely love how minimal FreeBSD still is! Any modern Linux minimal is full of so much junk, completely agree with the people above. You have no idea how happy I am that I can use WindowMaker again without enabling a repo like epel ;) And I can do RPi 3 with it too! My router is a RPi 3 running Debian (yep, I know that the NIC is off a USB2 bus, but my internet speed is slower anyway), this will change shortly :D ipfw for the win I hope! Also, pkg!!?? No need to compile every little thing? Awesome!!!

The big kicker is checking into ZFS. I've used BTRFS without issues. However, BTRFS seems to try and be ZFSy, just very, very immature. I've read all the pain people have with ZFS, and found in the Handbook that, yes, ZFS is a hog, but a tunable hog. So, I think the fools complaining about ZFS need to check out the handbook and read up on tuning ZFSs memory usage. But experience may prove me wrong...

I love LXC and about to dive into Jails. I could never get these to work, but I was 12y/o and it's been 18 years and I never new about things like ezjail (never read documentation back then). This should be too cool!

In any event. Hello again FreeBSD! I still think your the best and better than that pufferfish ;D
 

m0nkey_

New Member

Thanks: 7
Messages: 11

Greetings all. Not exactly new to FreeBSD, but it's probably about time I get my post count above zero.

My first introduction to FreeBSD was back in 2000 when FreeBSD 4.2 was released. I migrated from RedHat 6.2 (pre RHEL). It ran for a few years until I eventually moved out of my parents home into my own where I didn't have the space. Fast forward many years later, I find myself living in a different country and I find my way back to FreeBSD via FreeNAS. I've been a FreeNAS user for the last 4 years and just this week I find myself back on FreeBSD. Everything configured including ZFS, Automatic snapshots, Samba and NFS4 ACLs.

While I was on FreeNAS, I became a very active member of the FreeNAS community. If you've ever been to the FreeNAS forum or the chatroom, you've probably seen my posts. I've created a few FreeNAS tutorials in both written and video forms which are referenced almost daily.

Now I feel it's time to start becoming an active member of the FreeBSD community. I also plan to contribute back by pulling down the FreeBSD documentation to help out with simple things like spelling, grammar, etc. I may also end up writing a tutorial or two.

Anyway, it's great to be back on FreeBSD.

Oh, if you're going to BSDCan next week, I will hopefully see you there!

All the best,
Dave (aka m0nkey_)
 

ldilley

New Member

Thanks: 1
Messages: 2

Well met, fellow FreeBSD denizens. I've been a mirthful toor user since 4.7-STABLE. Like m0nkey_ before me, I very recently figured I would *try* to become more active in the community by leveraging these forums and potentially maintaining a port or more.

Regards,
Lloyd D.
 
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