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Hello, Greetings & Self-Introduction Thread

MaxBradley78

New Member


Messages: 1

While a long time Unix user. I am new to forums, discussion threads, replies and social media. Most of the questions I have revolve around tracking changes and matching them up with problem reports (bugs). So far, I have not been able to find a forum that deals with these, though I am sure it is out there, I just haven't found it yet. I am working with a code base that contains both mishmash of 10.3, 11-STABLE and Head with little indication of where many of the changes came from. As the eternal optimist, I hope to match up code with SVN revision diffs. Any pointers would be appreciated.
 

masterofnull

New Member

Thanks: 2
Messages: 12

Hello all!

I am a 22 postgrad in the District, who studied political science until he didn't like politics.

Previously I was on linux because I was cheap, and I programmed in R (mostly libraries at first for statistical work but thats how a lot of guys get into it now). I chose FreeBSD after being a habitual OS hopper and have been lurking the forums for like 6 months for help and I find it interesting. I chose this OS because its goddamn awesome.

It has the community of Arch without the ass****s. It has the history and documentation of Debian, but I find the message boards and mailing lists much more professional than the most professional linux distro imho.

I find the ports collection as amazing and the ability to install binaries or compile from the ports as one of the best solutions I have used. As a programmer trying to become a professional C programmer, I find so many aspects of FreeBSD as great for learning.

Additionally, I don't hate the FSF but I find that side of Linux incredibly alienating. When I found out Berkeley DB wasn't on BSD license but instead a GPL compliant license, I did a lot of digging into licenses and found that this is an important distinction in philosophy. I think that GPL 3.0 can be a beneficial license to corporations wanting the Open Source community to maintain their software for them, while the BSD license truly is in the spirit of open source.

I am rocking an intel nuci7kyk (i7 6770hq, 32 2133 RAM, 2x samsung 950 pro nvme in a raid0) as my pc and I have a xeon e3 1245 v5 with 6 TB of storage and 16 gb of ECC RAM (will upgrade as needed) as my home server. I also have a few pis I use for projects.

I really am excited because I think freebsd will finally be a home OS for me and I hope to start contributing as I can.

best,
jack
 

PedroReina

New Member

Thanks: 2
Messages: 1

Hi everyone. I'm new to this forums and new to FreeBSD. Debian user for about 20 years, but always well aware of the BSD family: http://pedroreina.net/docencia/sleser/sleser11.html

The systemd desease push me to learn FreeBSD, although I was always interested in FreeBSD.

I'm going to start learning the server side of FreeBSD and I've set up my first box, but later I want to try desktops as well. I'm very interested in free desktops.

In my job I usually administer both servers and desktops. Although 20 years using Debian is a lot of time, I hope to be able to use FreeBSD in my own boxes. I'm close to my retirement, so the most likely is that I cannot change to FreeBSD in my job, sorry.
 

coffeina

New Member

Thanks: 2
Messages: 1

Hello everyone, I'm now trying FreeBSD.
My name is Andrew and I'm from Poland and I'm a software engineer. My first FreeBSD system is only few days away. For few years I was using Linux - Fedora distribution, now I want to try BSD.
 

bchaffin72

New Member


Messages: 8

Greetings, all. I just joined, as I recently put FreeBSD 11 on my laptop, added MATE for a desktop. Not that I'm a stranger to Unix-like systems. I sampled 32-bit FreeBSD a few years ago on an old computer and have been a heavy user of various Linux distributons since 2002. I generally know my way around a command line......:D

I started with computers back in the 80s, in school. BASIC programming with the Apple IIe and later the IIGS. Later, taught myself C/C++, some assembly, and Prolog . Never been more than a hobby programmer.
 

bchaffin72

New Member


Messages: 8

I still have an Apple IIgs, in working order :cool:
That's cool. The IIgs constitutes the last Apple product I ever used. First computer I had of my own was a Tandy 1000. It was slightly behind the times, even then, but, being pre www times, I mostly just used it for more BASIC and a game here and there.
 

CraigHB

Member

Thanks: 22
Messages: 90

First post here on the on FreeBSD Forums so hello all.

I've been a long time Linux user, off and on since Debian 1.0 which is my preferred distribution. I was away from Debian/Linux for a few years and recently had a need to set up an installation. So I downloaded the lasted release and loaded 'er up. Boy was I shocked. things have changed so much in the time I was away. I'm not a happy Debian/Linux user anymore.

I feel the Linux community has lost their sense of direction. Not that it was ever clearly defined, but I could count on a Unix like KISS system in the past. Now it seems sweeping changes from upstream are being forced on the community. These changes have created added complexity, circular dependencies, and a less reliable system. The Debian system I set up has done some screwy things on me just in the short time I've been using it. First time I've had this kind of trouble with Linux.

I think it's time to move on from Linux. FreeBSD seems to be the obvious choice. I've been doing a lot of reading about the system and it all sounds enticing. One thing I like about FreeBSD, they do the whole package, kernel, init system, and user-land. Because of the way development is handled with Linux distributions, a single lousy developer was able to do enough damage to sour me on the whole community. I don't think that's something that could ever happen with FreeBSD, at least it seems a lot less likely.
 

bchaffin72

New Member


Messages: 8

I feel the Linux community has lost their sense of direction. Not that it was ever clearly defined, but I could count on a Unix like KISS system in the past. Now it seems sweeping changes from upstream are being forced on the community. These changes have created added complexity, circular dependencies, and a less reliable system. The Debian system I set up has done some screwy things on me just in the short time I've been using it. First time I've had this kind of trouble with Linux.
Well, it was a failure of a Debian based distro that prompted me to put FreeBSD on my laptop.
 

TomHsiung

Member

Thanks: 5
Messages: 74

Hello, guys

I am a clinical pharmacy specialist in China. My expertise is infectious diseases, critical care, and hematology. Now I am a graduate student in China Pharmaceutical University. Recently, I spend most of my time on the research for a anticoagulant, that is, warfarin. I think to learn some computer and network science would be much helpful for my later career life, yes, life-long learning is of great!

Tom
 

bchaffin72

New Member


Messages: 8

Hello, guys

I am a clinical pharmacy specialist in China. My expertise is infectious diseases, critical care, and hematology. Now I am a graduate student in China Pharmaceutical University. Recently, I spend most of my time on the research for a anticoagulant, that is, warfarin. I think to learn some computer and network science would be much helpful for my later career life, yes, life-long learning is of great!

Tom
Welcome,Tom. Never hurts to learn new things.:)

If nothing else, keeping up my computer skills and adding to them has saved me time and money when things broke. And, if you're technically minded, it's fun to be able to set things up just to see how they work.
 

geheimnisse

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Thanks: 3
Messages: 11

Hey everyone.

I'm a long-time Linux user - started in early 2001. After the systemd push I began playing with OpenBSD on my laptop, while keeping Linux on my main tower PC. After using FreeBSD to create an NAS out of an extra PC, I decided to dump Linux off my tower and switch to FreeBSD. Then I said, "Screw it!", and switched from OpenBSD to FreeBSD on my Thinkpad. The final transition to FreeBSD happened a short few months ago.

Really enjoying the transition so far. Feels snappier than OpenBSD did, get better battery life on my laptop than OpenBSD (by about two hours), and both OpenBSD and FreeBSD feel much saner than Linux. I'm continuing to use OpenBSD on my web server and will use it for an upcoming firewall project and some other miscellaneous projects, but I'm so glad I ended up on FreeBSD as my primary operating system.

Glad to see the forum is so active as well.
 

Mappack

New Member


Messages: 3

Hey everyone,

I go by the name 'Mappack' on a lot of things. I am a former FreeBSD user who is trying to get back to running FreeBSD after running GNU/Linux exclusively for a while.
I am planning to use FreeBSD with Lumina on my new laptop. It seems that I'll have to wait until I receive the tools to flash Coreboot, though, since the HP BIOS won't let me boot FreeBSD.

I'm excited to be a part of this community again!
 

PacketMan

Aspiring Daemon

Thanks: 104
Messages: 773

... Then I said, "Screw it!", and ....The final transition to FreeBSD happened a short few months ago. Really enjoying the transition so far. .... but I'm so glad I ended up on FreeBSD as my primary operating system.

Glad to see the forum is so active as well.
There is a fair few of us with a similar story. I rid my house of Microsoft Windows and with the exception of one machine running Ubuntu, all the other machines (desktops and server(s)) are FreeBSD and my household has never had such a near-zero issues experience, and since I'm the IT guy in my house that means a lot less work for me responding to "dad the computer is messed up again".

And yes, this forum is awesome, not just in being active, but with knowledge, professionalism, honesty, integrity, etc. I've been on a lot of forums (IT, networking, sport fishing, etc, etc, etc) and this one is in a class of its own.

Welcome top FreeBSD, there is a bit of a learning curve and discipline, but its well worth it.
 

bchaffin72

New Member


Messages: 8

There is a fair few of us with a similar story. I rid my house of Microsoft Windows and with the exception of one machine running Ubuntu, all the other machines (desktops and server(s)) are FreeBSD and my household has never had such a near-zero issues experience, and since I'm the IT guy in my house that means a lot less work for me responding to "dad the computer is messed up again".
It was certainly the same for me. I stopped using Windows as a primary OS long ago, but still kept dual boot systems for a while. Eventually dropped those too and went pure Linux or *BSD, depending on the machine. Along with all the Linux distros I've used over the years, I sampled NetBSD, OpenBSD, and FreeBSD at various points. I liked FreeBSD best so, when I recently found myself with the need to reformat my laptop, FreeBSD was my choice.
 

quintus

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Messages: 1

Hello everybody,

I am a graduate student of computer science, and I have used Linux based operating systems for about 3 or so years. I have used/tried a handful of them: Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Debian, Arch Linux, Void Linux, Gentoo, and Linux From Scratch (twice). I never really had a problem with any of them. I jumped around mostly out of boredom. I wanted to try something non-linux based so I tested FreeBSD and OpenBSD. I like the BSD family because of the design choices and philosophy they uphold in delivering an operating system.
 

CraigHB

Member

Thanks: 22
Messages: 90

I like the BSD family because of the design choices and philosophy they uphold in delivering an operating system.
Hello quintus,

Yes it's rather refreshing the design philosophy FreeBSD adheres to. I'm finding it well organized and clean. I'm fairly new to FreeBSD myself, though I've been a Linux user for a long time. The interface is familiar which makes it an easy transition, though the mechanics are quite different which is good, much better machinery.
 

Spartrekus

Member

Thanks: 7
Messages: 73

HELLO WORLD.

I like Unix system(s), Unix history, literature, computing sciences, and philosophy.
I am programming mostly using C language. I have too C++, but I always prefer C.
I have old (archived) notions of ASM.
Python is not my favorite programming language, at all. Perl, Ruby,...PHP,...neither.
Best of the best is C (and ASM).

Pitty that, - today, FreeBSD looks like Linux, but less than the original first BSD and Berkeley developments and philosophy (Sys5, Sys7).

c IS the Solution. FreeBSD is for everyone, willing to have a custom Unix-like operating system.
 

giahung1997

Member

Thanks: 11
Messages: 46

Hi everyone, I'm a newcomer :)

First of all, I want you to know I'm a not very smart person and I lacked formal education (I quit school at grade 7 of 12 grades education system of Vietnam and after that self taught), so if wrote something obscure or impolite, I apologize first.

I was a normal Windows 7 user until MS pushed Windows 8 and made Windows 7 Update broken (it checking and checking forever…). The copyright law was applied stricter, you know most Vietnamese use cracked software, Windows Loader by DAZ is friend :D I have never like MetroUI, though. So I made a transition to Ubuntu Linux. Luckily it was not very hard, Ubuntu was friendly :) … until it switched to SystemD. I still remember my computer hung forever at something systemd-(not remembered)d. I switched again to MXLinux15, and now I’m using MXLinux17 :)

I read a lot from your forum and wish sometime in the future I could test FreeBSD in Virtualbox, right now I can’t because my cpu too old, it’s just not support hardware virtualization :(