Solved Handbook's hashing tool suggestion for Linux/Windows/Apple Mac OSX

leebrown66

Well-Known Member

Thanks: 102
Messages: 303

#2
Why promote non-BSD software? I don't see the need for a Windows/Linux/Apple machine just to check a checksum when FreeBSD provides the tool right in base.
 
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pensador_13

pensador_13

Active Member

Thanks: 43
Messages: 180

#3
Why promote non-BSD software? I don't see the need for a Windows/Linux/Apple machine just to check a checksum when FreeBSD provides the tool right in base.
It is a user friendly software for people that use a Windows/Linux/Apple machine and want to check the checksum of a FreeBSD image.
 

herrbischoff

Active Member

Thanks: 69
Messages: 165

#4
There's zero need for a GUI application to do this. On pretty much any OS, you can just use OpenSSL:

Code:
openssl sha256 <file>
 

tingo

Daemon

Thanks: 336
Messages: 1,835

#6
It would, but (IMHO) recommending them gui tools outside of FreeBSD will only give them false hope. FreeBSD requires a certain amount of terminal work, a certain amount of manual configuration. A new user should accept that challenge early on, or perhaps think twice about selecting FreeBSD now. Perhaps try something else until she / he feel comfortable enough, then try FreeBSD.
 

Duffyx

Member

Thanks: 14
Messages: 48

#8
In windows you can simply right click a file and ask for its checksum.
Why would you want a third party application?

Right Click -> CRC SHA -> SHA256
 
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pensador_13

pensador_13

Active Member

Thanks: 43
Messages: 180

#9
In windows you can simply right click a file and ask for its checksum.
Why would you want a third party application?

Right Click -> CRC SHA -> SHA256
Is it possible to copy your suggestion's result and past it on the find bar of notepad to see if it's found on the checksum file of the download page?
 

Nicola Mingotti

Well-Known Member

Thanks: 103
Messages: 252

#11
In my opinion GUI tools should be keept out as much as possible of the great FreeBSD HandBook.

Rationale.
1] It is extremely boring to write GUI tools documentation.
1.1] => command line have almost always a nice man page. GUI almost never have one,
they are try&pray tools.
2] GUI descriptions take a lot of space in PDF.
3] It is harder to read the description of a GUI tool than to read a sequence of command lines.
4] If you know the shell commands you can "easily" make yourself a GUI [e.g. with Tk]
the reverse is not true. If you know how to use a GUI you are trapped there.
5] You can easily automatize and batch shell commands, not true for GUI.
6] If a user is not willing to use the command line then I reccomend him to use OSX since it is (AFAIK) a FreeBSD with a beautiful GUI for everything.
 
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