Frequency and CPU !

grahamperrin

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Trihexagonal

Son of Beastie

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teo, unplug your laptop, remove the battery, wait one minute, replace the battery, plug the power cord back in and see if it won't power on and boot up like nothing happened.

My obake box shut down at 100C compiling ports and played dead for a couple weeks. I just did the above and it's back in service ready to finish where it left off, with the fan in use this time.
 

kpedersen

Son of Beastie

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teo are you definitely using powerd?

This is a service unique to FreeBSD that scales back the processor when not under heavy load.

You also will likely want to set the max Cstate in your rc.conf

Code:
powerd_enable="YES"
performance_cx_lowest="LOW"
economy_cx_lowest="LOW"

You can also consider locking frequencies to low levels if the build itself is too heavy on the CPU: performance_cpu_freq=XXX
Powerd takes a number of optional flags you may be interested in: https://www.freebsd.org/cgi/man.cgi?powerd
 
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teo

Aspiring Daemon

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teo are you definitely using powerd?

This is a service unique to FreeBSD that scales back the processor when not under heavy load.

You also will likely want to set the max Cstate in your rc.conf

Code:
powerd_enable="YES"
performance_cx_lowest="LOW"
economy_cx_lowest="LOW"

You can also consider locking frequencies to low levels if the build itself is too heavy on the CPU: performance_cpu_freq=XXX
Powerd takes a number of optional flags you may be interested in: https://www.freebsd.org/cgi/man.cgi?powerd

kpedersen of some of the examples I have put was not correct? I remember some of those explanatory examples on the internet, I did it before my Notebook died, today I am waiting for a second hand motherboard to replace it with the original one because there are no new ones left, for example in the file /etc/rc.conf

Code:
powerd_enable="YES"
powerd_flags="-a hiadaptive"
Or:
Code:
powerd_enable="YES"
powerd_flags="-n adaptive -a hiadaptive -b adaptive -m 800 -M 1600"

With powerdxx:
Code:
powerdxx_enable="YES"
powerdxx_flags="-n adaptive -a hiadaptive -b adaptive -m 800 -M 1600"

performance_cx_lowest="C1"
economy_cx_lowest="Cmax"

As I was also testing with:
Code:
performance_cx_lowest="Cmax"
economy_cx_lowest="Cmax"

The multiple configurations to regulate the temperature and its high consumption of the base frequency and its cores, none seems effective at least in my notebook, starting with FreeBSD in its installation and activation of powerd. The TDP of the CPU, is of 35 W, with FreeBSD that it used to be above of 70% viewing some video fragment on youtube, and worse above 96 or 97% compiling some small binary package that automatically shut down the notebook. One question, does it depend on the quality or brand of thermal paste to keep the cooling at bay ? For your, which thermal paste is the best?
Tem.png

Triexagonal said:
....unplug your laptop, remove the battery, wait one minute, replace the battery, plug the power cord back in and see if it won't power on and boot up like nothing happened.

My obake box shut down at 100C compiling ports and played dead for a couple weeks. I just did the above and it's back in service ready to finish where it left off, with the fan in use this time.
I tried several ways looking at videos or information on the internet, it gives no signs of life, not even the small input led of the power supply that displayed a small light when connected to the notebook.
 

kpedersen

Son of Beastie

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As I was also testing with:
Code:
performance_cx_lowest="Cmax"
economy_cx_lowest="Cmax"
I think you are generally doing it correctly. Though the rc.conf manpage specifically mentions LOW and HIGH. I would try LOW on both economy and performance to make sure.

The next thing is if you could after a restart output the relevant sysctl values, just to make sure that the correct Cstates are being used. Mine output C8.

Finally, run the following as root (after starting powerd):

powerd -v

This should give you a realtime overview of what powerd is doing. It should tell you that it is trying to scale the CPU to one of the lower frequencies.

(disable the powerdxx port for now, just in case it is conflicting).
 

fernandel

Daemon

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I have Lenovo T495 which suppoesed to have better support and I do not have a problem. But I did have a problem when I used ports and buld something like llvm for example and temperature were 91 C. Never turned off but I do not want to kill my first laptop in life.
When I bought laptop it came with Windows and two or three days I played before I wipe off and installed FreeBSD. On Windows time I check temperature and later compare with FreeBSD, it was lower on Windows
The same temperature "problem" was when I use iMack with FreeBSD installed on. On OS X temperature was all the time lower than on FreeBSD. I do not know how is on other BSD's on FreeBSD is not good.
 
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teo

Aspiring Daemon

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I think you are generally doing it correctly. Though the rc.conf manpage specifically mentions LOW and HIGH. I would try LOW on both economy and performance to make sure.

The next thing is if you could after a restart output the relevant sysctl values, just to make sure that the correct Cstates are being used. Mine output C8.

Finally, run the following as root (after starting powerd):

powerd -v

This should give you a realtime overview of what powerd is doing. It should tell you that it is trying to scale the CPU to one of the lower frequencies.

(disable the powerdxx port for now, just in case it is conflicting).

Hello kpedersen, how do you proceed to display the relevant values of sysctl? Duties for when you are resurrected the notebook.
The two examples of information I remember configured with powerd and powerdxx, in which case powerd was disabled so that it does not conflict.
 

kpedersen

Son of Beastie

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relevant values of sysctl? Duties for when you are resurrected the notebook.
I tend to just list them all and grep. So something like:

sysctl -a | grep cx_lowest

Now, lets also check what your lowest Cstate is. I have once had a machine where there was no support for most Cstates.

sysctl -a | grep cx_supported
 

Trihexagonal

Son of Beastie

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I tried several ways looking at videos or information on the internet, it gives no signs of life, not even the small input led of the power supply that displayed a small light when connected to the notebook.
But you do not say you followed my instructions, teo. So I will try again.

I plugged mine in and no sign of life.

I unplugged it

Took the battery out and waited one minute.

Replaced the battery.

Plugged it back in and the charging light came on immediately.

Now tell me you did that and whether it worked or not, teo.
 
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