Favorite Editors

CodeBlock

Active Member

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First off, mods, please don't murder me too brutally for this.

Second of all, without getting into a major uproar, what editor do you use, and what are your favorite features about it?

I personally use vim (and have been starting to use gVim a bit more). I love it's syntax highlight, line numbering, auto indent, function completion, all the plugins available for it, etc. Suits my needs very well. Vimtutor was also very helpful when I was first playing around with vim.
 
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CodeBlock

CodeBlock

Active Member

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Messages: 216

killasmurf86 said:
vim, if not vim, then probably geany

I've used Geany a few times. Not bad, but like you, I prefer vim.

I've used netbeans quite a bit for PHP dev. Not bad.
 

gilinko

Well-Known Member

Reaction score: 58
Messages: 416

It depends.

In console I'm a vi/vim user with a tendency towards vi as I deal a lot with solaris and "older" machines. Programming etc it's emacs(or xemacs) and sometimes Eclipse for some java. I also use Texmaker (latex) for reports and such.

It all depends on what I want to do... dokuwiki is another "editor" that is used frequently.
 

mickey

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 302
Messages: 747

My personal favourite for all kinds of editing tasks (C, Java, Text, *ML) is clearly JASSPA MicroEmacs.

Features I like the most include, but are not limited to:
  • Highly customizable
  • Syntax Highlighting
  • Auto-Indentation that can be turned *OFF* :)
  • Increase/Decrease indent of a marked code block
  • Fence Highlighting
  • Runs either in console or X mode
  • Also runs on Windows, so I don't have to switch
 

Brandybuck

Active Member

Reaction score: 12
Messages: 147

I have to shamefully confess that I have never learned all of the ins and outs of any editor. My preferred editor is XEmacs, just because it has a menu. Oh, and because it has awesome auto-indent. When I accidentally get into a console emacs, it takes me a while remember how to quit. But I like vi better. I've been using vi since 43BSD days in college. But I still don't know all the commands. Another reason I prefer XEmacs is because it has scrollbars, making navigation quicker in larger files. I prefer vi (and nvi) over vim.

Consequently I end up using both. XEmacs for programming and editing large files, and vi for editing config files and outside the gui.
 

Voltar

Active Member

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Messages: 191

I am actually fond of pico, as bad as that sounds, and ee (since it is in the base system).

I've never really like vi/vim, I know it can be very powerful if you take the time to learn it, I just never find that time.
 

rbelk

Active Member

Reaction score: 57
Messages: 199

vi/vim

A VI workalike editor is my choice, and most UNIX base installs have one. I use VIM when I can :p.
 

anomie

Aspiring Daemon

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Messages: 781

I prefer vim on all my desktops. I generally don't go to the trouble of installing it on servers, so I stick with nvi there.

I recommend ee to my shell users. Almost none of them wants to use any form of vi or emacs.

---

I'll add that if I am editing something for distribution to an audience via email (as opposed to on a wiki), I compose the document using OOo writer and then export to PDF.
 

fronclynne

Daemon

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Messages: 1,296

For editing config files? /usr/bin/ee or /usr/bin/vi work equally well.

For programming? Err, no.

For actual writing? I just (re)discovered /usr/local/bin/jstar, and my 40+ year old typewriter may have some competition. (once it's written, openoffice isn't a half bad layout editor, if a bit awkward)
 

rbelk

Active Member

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Messages: 199

fronclynne said:
For editing config files? /usr/bin/ee or /usr/bin/vi work equally well.

For programming? Err, no.

For actual writing? I just (re)discovered /usr/local/bin/jstar, and my 40+ year old typewriter may have some competition. (once it's written, openoffice isn't a half bad layout editor, if a bit awkward)
fronclynne, what is jstar?
 

jb_fvwm2

Daemon

Reaction score: 205
Messages: 1,829

editors/joe runs in several ways depending upon
how you start it. Yesterday I noted,
#jpico
(More usable now at least, here, than jstar)
 

MG

Active Member

Reaction score: 21
Messages: 213

Beastie said:
Mousepad under X. Otherwise, it's nvi... what else?

I found leafpad today. It's almost the same as mousepad, but it doesn't need the Xfce4 packages and it has no stupid root warning bar
 

Beastie

Daemon

Reaction score: 542
Messages: 2,275

MG said:
I found leafpad today. It's almost the same as mousepad, but it doesn't need the Xfce4 packages and it has no stupid root warning bar
I used Leafpad before, and yes, they're very similar. But since I run Xfce, I just use what comes with it.
 

Oko

Daemon

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Messages: 1,620

rbelk said:
vi/vim

You will always have vi on any UNIX base install :p.

Nonsense!!!


First of all there are several different "vi" editors. For us on BSD systems vi:=nvi. For Linux people vi usually means vim. On Solaris vi is old vi from System V coded by Bill Joy (even that one has basically four flavors depends on the particular private version). Second of all default installation of NetBSD for instance doesn't have any version of vi. The only editor which is present on any Unix base installation is ed. By the way if you boot your computer in a single user mode (if you use BSDs) the default editor is ed.

Best,
OKO

P.S. I use 95% of the time nvi for editing. The other 5% of time I use ed.
As FreeBSD forum member rliegh once said:"Using vim on a *bsd box is just sick and wrong, imo. nvi for life! :D". There is even a hospital here in California that can cure people from VIM.
 

rbelk

Active Member

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Messages: 199

Oko said:
Nonsense!!!


First of all there are several different "vi" editors. For us on BSD systems vi:=nvi. For Linux people vi usually means vim. On Solaris vi is old vi from System V coded by Bill Joy (even that one has basically four flavors depends on the particular private version). Second of all default installation of NetBSD for instance doesn't have any version of vi. The only editor which is present on any Unix base installation is ed. By the way if you boot your computer in a single user mode (if you use BSDs) the default editor is ed.

Best,
OKO

P.S. I use 95% of the time nvi for editing. The other 5% of time I use ed.
As FreeBSD forum member rliegh once said:"Using vim on a *bsd box is just sick and wrong, imo. nvi for life! :D". There is even a hospital here in California that can cure people from VIM.

Oko, your correct The only version of UNIX and UNIX workalikes that I have used that did not have some form of VI after a base installation was NetBSD. I have used a lot, but not all, of UNIX and UNIX workalikes. I should have wriiten "A VI workalike editor is my choice, and most UNIX base installs have one!". I stand corrected and my original post has been edited!

BTW, I have written scripts with ed to do strange text manipulation, I know that's nuts isn't it!
 

graudeejs

Son of Beastie

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Messages: 4,617

correct me If i'm wrong, but doesn't Single Unix Specification, say, that Unix has to have vi (or work-alike).
I know Linux/BSD aren't Unix
 
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