Enter the url of github/gitlab repos of non-freebsd-ports you are using

I was thinking for ports like "ztop".




Next links , which i use as software do not exist in ports but making a port should be fairly easy, feel free to add your own








In fact i wonder how to make these ports as porters-handbook is above my head (currently)...
 
They're not easy. Some parts, like the first steps of porting, have become easier for me, but not to the final steps of porting. I tend to need lots of help to get something. Adjusting something on my computer isn't difficult. Showing a patch is doable for me, but still not easy. There's another learning curve which I haven't reached yet, to commit a patch, as I really don't want to do this part, but I believe is a necessity, especially for ports with no maintainer and the taskers seem overwhelmed.
 
In essence a lot of them are just "git pull ; followed by : gmake build/yarn install/npm install/go build" and nothing more.
For instance i use :
I only do,
Code:
git pull
yarn install
 

zirias@

Developer
Especially tools like yarn and npm are a major headache for porting. They typically download and install tons of dependencies. One concern with that is: For a port, you need a reproducible build (for, I hope, obvious reasons). So you have to make sure that fixed versions are used for everything. The other one is: distfiles must be protected with a hash, to avoid any tampering. With a yarn build downloading hundreds of tiny "packages", adding all of them individually as distfiles isn't practical. Porters resorted to put them in their own tarball and host them somewhere, just to get around these horrors.

Don't get that wrong, but without experience creating ports, you can't relly judge whether something would be simple.

Nevertheless, getting started isn't that hard. Things that most likely are simple are smaller software packages written in C or C++ and using a well-known build-system like e.g. GNU autotools or cmake. Start working with these, following the porters handbook, and you will learn quickly.
 
If i understand , some stuff might look very easy at first sight, but when there is a dependency hell deeper in the chain, making a port becomes very difficult or impossible.
 
Today, on my two FreeBSD servers, I only install FreeBSD base, and a limited number of ports (a few dozen on the small server, about 150 or 200 on the large server). The only other software installed is Python, and comes from pip.

I don't think I have EVER installed anything from github or gitlab directly.
 
You asked for it.
(I have no idea what to do with such a link. This one should probably get fetched from the official site.)
 

 
You asked for it.
(I have no idea what to do with such a link. This one should probably get fetched from the official site.)
Not directly related pgadmin3 port is not compiling on my PC. Not many alternatives available. There is phpPgAdmin
 
Not directly related pgadmin3 port is not compiling on my PC. Not many alternatives available. There is phpPgAdmin
pgadmin3 is "out". pgadmin4 works, but it entertains a full LAMP stack (in server mode) and has lots of prereqs. It can be made a py-* port, but that's a bunch of work, and it is picky about the versions of prereqs. And there are more gotchas: you need something to run it (e.g. uwsgi), it provides local filespace for web clients, it connects to the maintenance functions of the databases, it needs newest MIT kerberos when SPNEGO is used, etc. - how much of this should a port define and what should be left to the admin?
 
I can probably whip up a port Makefile for sfwbar, but I've no way of testing it, as I don't have a FreeBSD system handy. If anyone wants to test it, I can post a prototype.
 
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