Can't access anything connected through Netgear router

borffis

New Member

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Upon booting with a Netgear AC1600 WiFi router plugged into my ethernet card, dmesg reports:

Code:
Setting up harvesting: PURE_RDRAND,[UMA],[FS_ATIME],SWI,INTERRUPT,NET_NG,NET_ETHER,NET_TUN,MOUSE,KEYBOARD,ATTACH,CACHED
Feeding entropy: 
info: [drm] Enabling RC6 states: RC6 on, RC6p on, RC6pp off
.
lo0: link state changed to UP
em0: link state changed to UP
Starting Network: lo0 em0.
lo0: flags=8049<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST> metric 0 mtu 16384
    options=680003<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,LINKSTATE,RXCSUM_IPV6,TXCSUM_IPV6>
    inet6 ::1 prefixlen 128
    inet6 fe80::1%lo0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x2
    inet 127.0.0.1 netmask 0xff000000
    groups: lo
    nd6 options=21<PERFORMNUD,AUTO_LINKLOCAL>
em0: flags=8843<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> metric 0 mtu 1500
    options=81249b<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,VLAN_MTU,VLAN_HWTAGGING,VLAN_HWCSUM,LRO,WOL_MAGIC,VLAN_HWFILTER>
    ether b8:ca:3a:8d:e6:58
    inet6 fe80::baca:3aff:fe8d:e658%em0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x1
    media: Ethernet autoselect (1000baseT <full-duplex>)
    status: active
    nd6 options=23<PERFORMNUD,ACCEPT_RTADV,AUTO_LINKLOCAL>
Starting devd.
Autoloading module: uhid.ko
Autoloading module: wmt.ko
uhid0 on uhub4
uhid0: <USB Keyboard> on usbus1
Autoloading module: uhid.ko
Autoloading module: ums.ko
ums0 on uhub4
ums0: <Logitech USB Optical Mouse, class 0/0, rev 2.00/72.00, addr 4> on usbus1
ums0: 3 buttons and [XYZ] coordinates ID=0
Starting dhclient.
DHCPREQUEST on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67
DHCPREQUEST on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67
DHCPDISCOVER on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 interval 8
DHCPDISCOVER on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 interval 8
DHCPDISCOVER on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 interval 11
DHCPDISCOVER on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 interval 14
ugen1.4: <Logitech USB Optical Mouse> at usbus1 (disconnected)
ums0: at uhub4, port 2, addr 4 (disconnected)
ums0: detached
ugen1.4: <Logitech USB Optical Mouse> at usbus1
ums0 on uhub4
ums0: <Logitech USB Optical Mouse, class 0/0, rev 2.00/72.00, addr 4> on usbus1
ums0: 3 buttons and [XYZ] coordinates ID=0
DHCPDISCOVER on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 interval 9
DHCPDISCOVER on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 interval 10
No DHCPOFFERS received.
Trying recorded lease 192.168.42.10
No working leases in persistent database - sleeping.
Autoloading module: uhid.ko
Autoloading module: ums.ko
Starting ums0 moused.
Stopping moused.
Waiting for PIDS: 87842.
Starting ums0 moused.
add host 127.0.0.1: gateway lo0 fib 0: route already in table
add host ::1: gateway lo0 fib 0: route already in table
add net fe80::: gateway ::1
add net ff02::: gateway ::1
add net ::ffff:0.0.0.0: gateway ::1
add net ::0.0.0.0: gateway ::1
Waiting 30s for the default route interface: .............................

Thereafter, I can't connect. I apologize for irrelevant lines, but I opted to err on the side of caution by including everything.

When I plug my ethernet cable directly into my ethernet card, ifconfig's output reads:

Code:
em0: flags=8843<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> metric 0 mtu 1500
    options=81249b<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,VLAN_MTU,VLAN_HWTAGGING,VLAN_HWCSUM,LRO,WOL_MAGIC,VLAN_HWFILTER>
    ether b8:ca:3a:8d:e6:58
    inet6 fe80::baca:3aff:fe8d:e658%em0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x1
    inet 192.168.42.10 netmask 0xffffff00 broadcast 192.168.42.255
    media: Ethernet autoselect (1000baseT <full-duplex>)
    status: active
    nd6 options=23<PERFORMNUD,ACCEPT_RTADV,AUTO_LINKLOCAL>
lo0: flags=8049<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST> metric 0 mtu 16384
    options=680003<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,LINKSTATE,RXCSUM_IPV6,TXCSUM_IPV6>
    inet6 ::1 prefixlen 128
    inet6 fe80::1%lo0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x2
    inet 127.0.0.1 netmask 0xff000000
    groups: lo
    nd6 options=21<PERFORMNUD,AUTO_LINKLOCAL>

When I plug in the router, it reads:

Code:
em0: flags=8843<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> metric 0 mtu 1500
    options=81249b<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,VLAN_MTU,VLAN_HWTAGGING,VLAN_HWCSUM,LRO,WOL_MAGIC,VLAN_HWFILTER>
    ether b8:ca:3a:8d:e6:58
    inet6 fe80::baca:3aff:fe8d:e658%em0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x1
    media: Ethernet autoselect (1000baseT <full-duplex>)
    status: active
    nd6 options=23<PERFORMNUD,ACCEPT_RTADV,AUTO_LINKLOCAL>
lo0: flags=8049<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST> metric 0 mtu 16384
    options=680003<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,LINKSTATE,RXCSUM_IPV6,TXCSUM_IPV6>
    inet6 ::1 prefixlen 128
    inet6 fe80::1%lo0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x2
    inet 127.0.0.1 netmask 0xff000000
    groups: lo
    nd6 options=21<PERFORMNUD,AUTO_LINKLOCAL>

No, I don't know what the absence of the inet field or ip signifies; I'm a total ignoramus regarding this! To summarize: when the ethernet cable is plugged in, I've immediate access; through the router, nothing.

How can I configure it to recognize this ip or whatever?
 

gpw928

Well-Known Member

Reaction score: 175
Messages: 467

From reading the above, the equipment list I can discern is a FreeBSD system with a hardware Ethernet port (em0), a Netgear AC1600 WiFi router, and an Ethernet cable.

You say "when the ethernet cable is plugged in, I've immediate access". "plugged in" to what? "immediate access" to and from what?

What is your FreeBSD system plugged into when its not connected to the AC1600? This unidentified piece of the puzzle has a DHCP server resident on the 192.168.42.0/24 network. This is providing an IP address to your FreeBSD system when it boots. The file /var/db/dhclient.leases.em0 will identify the IP address of the DHCP server.

When you plug your FreeBSD system into the AC1600 the unidentified piece of your network would appear to be inaccessible. Maybe you just have to plug the AC1600 into that, BUT you will very likely have to configure the AC1600 first.

Have you configured the AC1600 in any way? Is it to be used just for Internet access? You need to tell us what you want to do with it before it's possible to suggest what to do next.
 
OP
B

borffis

New Member

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Messages: 5

Thanks for responding. I apologize for that first post's glaring ambiguity!

From reading the above, the equipment list I can discern is a FreeBSD system with a hardware Ethernet port (em0), a Netgear AC1600 WiFi router, and an Ethernet cable.

You say "when the ethernet cable is plugged in, I've immediate access". "plugged in" to what? "immediate access" to and from what?
In that instance, my computer's connected to a satellite modem, so to access websites, FTP servers, and other online resources. I usually test the connection by visiting duckduckgo.com with Links or another textual browser.

When you plug your FreeBSD system into the AC1600 the unidentified piece of your network would appear to be inaccessible. Maybe you just have to plug the AC1600 into that, BUT you will very likely have to configure the AC1600 first.
When the modem's connected to the AC1600, internet access via wifi is readily available, but I can't access anything online when the router's attached via a wired connection to my PC. Again, I'm sorry that I didn't explicate this, inter alia!

Have you configured the AC1600 in any way?
I haven't, and don't know how to do so. I just connected it. To court supreme understatement, documentation furnished with the unit is scant.

Is it to be used just for Internet access?
Yes.

You need to tell us what you want to do with it before it's possible to suggest what to do next.
All I need is to connect it to my PC so that I can visit websites, download and upload files, etc. while it concurrently transmits to other PCs and devices with wifi support.

If this is also horribly insufficient, please query as much as you need!
 

TempleBSD

Member

Reaction score: 13
Messages: 29

Interpretation 1/2:
This issue really isn't related to FreeBSD at all and therefore should not be asked in the forum. Please refrain from posting unrelated questions in the future. It is your network topology that needs fixing. From my understanding you need to buy a network switch. Take a look at TP-Links 18€ish Gigabit 5 Port Desktop Switch. I wonder whether your satmodem actually has only one RJ45 port? If there are multiple you could skip the switch and just connect to the ports on the modem. This (using the switch) would make your topology look like the following (ignore the dots ".").

Modem -- [LAN] -- Switch --+---- [LAN] ---- Netgear ---- [WiFI] ---- *devices
...........................................|
...........................................+---- [LAN] ---- PC

This is a zero-configuration setup. From the lack of useful info in your post I assume that you should do exactly this.

Interpretation 2/2:
If on the other hand, if your PC has multiple LAN ports, you can use it as a switch. Cons of using your desktop as a switch are: your PC needs to be on all the time for anything beyond it (meaning Netgear router and devices) to get network access and it also requires a bit of configuring. If thats not a problem you should set up a bridge AFAIK. Read ifconfig() for guidance on that and if you have questions, make a new post here. Your topology would be this:

Modem -- [LAN] ------ (port 1) PC (port2) ---- Netgear ---- [WiFI] ---- *devices
 

balanga

Son of Beastie

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Messages: 4,024

In that instance, my computer's connected to a satellite modem,

First I've come across anyone using a satellite modem. Can you provide details, kit, costs etc. It's something I'd like to explore.
 

mark_j

Daemon

Reaction score: 579
Messages: 1,056

Upon booting with a Netgear AC1600 WiFi router plugged into my ethernet card, dmesg reports:

Code:
Setting up harvesting: PURE_RDRAND,[UMA],[FS_ATIME],SWI,INTERRUPT,NET_NG,NET_ETHER,NET_TUN,MOUSE,KEYBOARD,ATTACH,CACHED
Feeding entropy:
info: [drm] Enabling RC6 states: RC6 on, RC6p on, RC6pp off
.
lo0: link state changed to UP
em0: link state changed to UP
Starting Network: lo0 em0.
lo0: flags=8049<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST> metric 0 mtu 16384
    options=680003<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,LINKSTATE,RXCSUM_IPV6,TXCSUM_IPV6>
    inet6 ::1 prefixlen 128
    inet6 fe80::1%lo0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x2
    inet 127.0.0.1 netmask 0xff000000
    groups: lo
    nd6 options=21<PERFORMNUD,AUTO_LINKLOCAL>
em0: flags=8843<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> metric 0 mtu 1500
    options=81249b<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,VLAN_MTU,VLAN_HWTAGGING,VLAN_HWCSUM,LRO,WOL_MAGIC,VLAN_HWFILTER>
    ether b8:ca:3a:8d:e6:58
    inet6 fe80::baca:3aff:fe8d:e658%em0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x1
    media: Ethernet autoselect (1000baseT <full-duplex>)
    status: active
    nd6 options=23<PERFORMNUD,ACCEPT_RTADV,AUTO_LINKLOCAL>
Starting devd.
Autoloading module: uhid.ko
Autoloading module: wmt.ko
uhid0 on uhub4
uhid0: <USB Keyboard> on usbus1
Autoloading module: uhid.ko
Autoloading module: ums.ko
ums0 on uhub4
ums0: <Logitech USB Optical Mouse, class 0/0, rev 2.00/72.00, addr 4> on usbus1
ums0: 3 buttons and [XYZ] coordinates ID=0
Starting dhclient.
DHCPREQUEST on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67
DHCPREQUEST on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67
DHCPDISCOVER on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 interval 8
DHCPDISCOVER on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 interval 8
DHCPDISCOVER on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 interval 11
DHCPDISCOVER on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 interval 14
ugen1.4: <Logitech USB Optical Mouse> at usbus1 (disconnected)
ums0: at uhub4, port 2, addr 4 (disconnected)
ums0: detached
ugen1.4: <Logitech USB Optical Mouse> at usbus1
ums0 on uhub4
ums0: <Logitech USB Optical Mouse, class 0/0, rev 2.00/72.00, addr 4> on usbus1
ums0: 3 buttons and [XYZ] coordinates ID=0
DHCPDISCOVER on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 interval 9
DHCPDISCOVER on em0 to 255.255.255.255 port 67 interval 10
No DHCPOFFERS received.
Trying recorded lease 192.168.42.10
No working leases in persistent database - sleeping.
Autoloading module: uhid.ko
Autoloading module: ums.ko
Starting ums0 moused.
Stopping moused.
Waiting for PIDS: 87842.
Starting ums0 moused.
add host 127.0.0.1: gateway lo0 fib 0: route already in table
add host ::1: gateway lo0 fib 0: route already in table
add net fe80::: gateway ::1
add net ff02::: gateway ::1
add net ::ffff:0.0.0.0: gateway ::1
add net ::0.0.0.0: gateway ::1
Waiting 30s for the default route interface: .............................

Thereafter, I can't connect. I apologize for irrelevant lines, but I opted to err on the side of caution by including everything.

When I plug my ethernet cable directly into my ethernet card, ifconfig's output reads:

Code:
em0: flags=8843<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> metric 0 mtu 1500
    options=81249b<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,VLAN_MTU,VLAN_HWTAGGING,VLAN_HWCSUM,LRO,WOL_MAGIC,VLAN_HWFILTER>
    ether b8:ca:3a:8d:e6:58
    inet6 fe80::baca:3aff:fe8d:e658%em0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x1
    inet 192.168.42.10 netmask 0xffffff00 broadcast 192.168.42.255
    media: Ethernet autoselect (1000baseT <full-duplex>)
    status: active
    nd6 options=23<PERFORMNUD,ACCEPT_RTADV,AUTO_LINKLOCAL>
lo0: flags=8049<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST> metric 0 mtu 16384
    options=680003<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,LINKSTATE,RXCSUM_IPV6,TXCSUM_IPV6>
    inet6 ::1 prefixlen 128
    inet6 fe80::1%lo0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x2
    inet 127.0.0.1 netmask 0xff000000
    groups: lo
    nd6 options=21<PERFORMNUD,AUTO_LINKLOCAL>

When I plug in the router, it reads:

Code:
em0: flags=8843<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> metric 0 mtu 1500
    options=81249b<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,VLAN_MTU,VLAN_HWTAGGING,VLAN_HWCSUM,LRO,WOL_MAGIC,VLAN_HWFILTER>
    ether b8:ca:3a:8d:e6:58
    inet6 fe80::baca:3aff:fe8d:e658%em0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x1
    media: Ethernet autoselect (1000baseT <full-duplex>)
    status: active
    nd6 options=23<PERFORMNUD,ACCEPT_RTADV,AUTO_LINKLOCAL>
lo0: flags=8049<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST> metric 0 mtu 16384
    options=680003<RXCSUM,TXCSUM,LINKSTATE,RXCSUM_IPV6,TXCSUM_IPV6>
    inet6 ::1 prefixlen 128
    inet6 fe80::1%lo0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x2
    inet 127.0.0.1 netmask 0xff000000
    groups: lo
    nd6 options=21<PERFORMNUD,AUTO_LINKLOCAL>

No, I don't know what the absence of the inet field or ip signifies; I'm a total ignoramus regarding this! To summarize: when the ethernet cable is plugged in, I've immediate access; through the router, nothing.

How can I configure it to recognize this ip or whatever?
The absence of it means router is not delivery the ip address to you.
You're very confusing in your descriptions. You need to enunciate what you're doing. Just saying "when I plug this cable into ..." makes no sense. We're not there to see it.

So when you " When I plug my ethernet cable directly into my ethernet card", where does the other end go?
Looking at your modem, the cable from your freebsd box should go to your router's yellow rj45 port.

Documentation is available Here.
 

gpw928

Well-Known Member

Reaction score: 175
Messages: 467

Does your AC1600 have an independant connection (fibre or copper wires) to the Internet (separate from the sat modem)? We have to have an answer to this question before getting much further with the solution.

You really do need to read the documentation and figure out how to access the configuration menus on the AC1600. You need to disable its DHCP server because it's clear from the logs that you already have one on your network (at a guess, running on your sat modem), and you can't have two on the same network.

The AC1600 has four LAN ports (coded yellow) and one WAN port (coded red).

What happens when you plug both your PC and your sat modem into LAN (yellow) ports of the AC1600? In this situation the AC1600 should just act as a switch, and you might be able to access the Internet from your PC (through the switch and then via the sat modem).
 

mark_j

Daemon

Reaction score: 579
Messages: 1,056

It sounds like he needs to look into bridge mode or equivalent. Some call it "wireless router mode" or the like.
Either way, I don't see this as a FreeBSD issue.
 

astyle

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 246
Messages: 558

I agree that this is not a freebsd issue, but that wifi router needs two ethernet cables - one going from router's WAN port to the satellite modem. The other ethernet cable needs to go from a LAN port to the Computer's ethernet port. No need to look into bridge mode or anything like that. It's that simple.
 

mark_j

Daemon

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Messages: 1,056

That really depends on whether his satellite modem performs NAT or not.
 

astyle

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 246
Messages: 558

That really depends on whether his satellite modem performs NAT or not.
NAT is done on the router, not the modem, and every home router on the global market does it. The modem is a direct connection to the Internet. I'm just suggesting that OP put the router between his PC and the modem.
 

astyle

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 246
Messages: 558

OP says he's using a Netgear router. He never said anything about using specifically IPSTAR Satellite Modem Router. Netgear is a very common brand for wi-fi routers, so there's truckloads of info on the Internet about it, like on dd-wrt.com. Modem->Ethernet Cable 1->Router's WAN port->NAT->Router's LAN port->Ethernet Cable 2->PC.
That router doesn't have DHCP turned on, which is why the FreeBSD PC is not getting an IP address. as shown by OP's /bin/sh dumps.
 

mark_j

Daemon

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That's not the issue. You made a blanket statement "NAT is done on the router, not the modem". I showed you one example that proves this false.
Take it or leave it.
 

gpw928

Well-Known Member

Reaction score: 175
Messages: 467

That [AC1600] router doesn't have DHCP turned on, which is why the FreeBSD PC is not getting an IP address. as shown by OP's /bin/sh dumps.
You are assuming that the FreeBSD PC is plugged into a LAN port of the AC1600.

These sorts of consumer-grade appliances almost always have the DHCP server (and DNS server) on by default, which is why I'm suspecting that the FreeBSD PC may be (wrongly) plugged into the WAN port.

As for the other issues discussed, loose language is rife in this area. Appliance = modem + router + firewall + switch + WiFi transciever + DNS server + DHCP server + NTP server (with some bits optional). Not everyone uses an appliance. It's common for the modem to be separate, even with appliances. And yes, Masquarading is required for transient external IP, and SNAT for static external IP, and that is technically done on the router component (where ever it is located).
 
OP
B

borffis

New Member

Reaction score: 1
Messages: 5

The absence of it means router is not delivery the ip address to you.
Understood. What might I do to rectify that?

So when you " When I plug my ethernet cable directly into my ethernet card", where does the other end go?
Into the satellite modem aforementioned in my first reply.

Looking at your modem, the cable from your freebsd box should go to your router's yellow rj45 port.
All I know is that the port is yellow and reads, "Internet."

Documentation is available Here.
Thanks!

Does your AC1600 have an independant connection (fibre or copper wires) to the Internet (separate from the sat modem)?
No.

What happens when you plug both your PC and your sat modem into LAN (yellow) ports of the AC1600? In this situation the AC1600 should just act as a switch, and you might be able to access the Internet from your PC (through the switch and then via the sat modem).
I'll try. Should I assume that those chromatic specifications aren't literally printed? Only one port is circumferently painted yellow!

I agree that this is not a freebsd issue, but that wifi router needs two ethernet cables - one going from router's WAN port to the satellite modem. The other ethernet cable needs to go from a LAN port to the Computer's ethernet port. No need to look into bridge mode or anything like that. It's that simple.
Again, after I peruse the router's documentation, I'll essay this. Thank you so much!

I deeply appreciate these responses, and I hope I haven't unduly inconvenienced anyone here.
 
OP
B

borffis

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Messages: 5

First I've come across anyone using a satellite modem. Can you provide details, kit, costs etc. It's something I'd like to explore.
It's a Hughes Ht1100, which retails for $25-$40. This hardware's performance is unobjectionable, but quality of service is largely contingent on climatic factors. If you reside in an area with long pluvial periods or otherwise generally overcast weather, I don't recommend it. I can tolerate and afford outages that would incense many people.

Moreover, though I can recommend Hughes's modem, their service's rates are extortionate and their service is generally awful. If you're really avid to patronize a satellite provider, find another!
 

gpw928

Well-Known Member

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Messages: 467

I'll try. Should I assume that those chromatic specifications aren't literally printed? Only one port is circumferently painted yellow!
According to page 22 of this AC1600 manual (which I guess may not be the same as yours) there are 4 LAN ports coded yellow and one WAN port coded red.

The essence of the advice is that if you don't have a new Internet service connection specifically for the AC1600, don't use the WAN port.
 

Trihexagonal

Son of Beastie

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Messages: 2,629

My Netgear router has a setting where it will not allow Internet access to a MAC it doesn't recognize.
I can be online, spoof my MAC, refresh the page and lose Ethernet connection to the net if it's not in the router tables.
 

astyle

Aspiring Daemon

Reaction score: 246
Messages: 558

That's not the issue. You made a blanket statement "NAT is done on the router, not the modem". I showed you one example that proves this false.
Take it or leave it.
That's only true if the router and modem are one device. In OP's case they are, but - if you read the thread carefully, you'll note that OP gets his connection working just fine without NAT if his PC is plugged directly into the modem. If you want to put a router between PC and modem, then you need NAT, and to do it on the router.
 
OP
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borffis

New Member

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Messages: 5

What happens when you plug both your PC and your sat modem into LAN (yellow) ports of the AC1600? In this situation the AC1600 should just act as a switch, and you might be able to access the Internet from your PC (through the switch and then via the sat modem).
This worked immediately. Thank you!

Again, I apologize if this subject was inapposite for this forum; I was convinced that this was a problem that necessitated configuration of software. Thanks once more to everyone for their advice.
 

gpw928

Well-Known Member

Reaction score: 175
Messages: 467

Well done, but you are not out of the woods yet. You have two network appliances appliances both trying to do the same job.

I can tell from what you posted above that your Hughes Ht1100 is currently being used to configure your existing 192.168.42.0/24 network (netmask 0xffffff00, broadcast 192.168.42.255), and it has a DHCP server running.

Assuming that you want to use the AC1600 to access the Inernet via the Ht1100, the AC1600 needs to have its DHCP server disabled, and be configured as an access point for your existing 192.168.42.0/24 network. This is a common, but not default, configuration for the AC1600.

All of this has nothing to do with FreeBSD. The Netgear Forum should be a good place to get help doing this. Though there are other options that look plausible.

Also, you will need to figure out how to access the configuration menu of the AC1600. Reading the manual and googling "netgear ac1600 access point" will help.
 
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