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What BSD OS to use

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by toungewithgills, Jun 14, 2009.

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  1. toungewithgills

    toungewithgills New Member

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    I am new to BSD an fired up to use the OS. I have limited experience in the Unix/Linux interface. I have used a older version of Ubuntu.

    Ok here is what I am after. I have heard about the Active-Active project, and would be interested in a box router. I am building a server network encompassing BSD, Linux, Windows and eventually Mac. I could stick to just one OS but you limit your choices then who can connect to you for the most part. That and BSD is like a rock compared to windows from what I have seen and listened to. I am beginning in my journey with this. I just can not quite figure out what BSD OS is best in what role. I have FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, PC-BSD all in my collection. I have various Linux OS collections as well. Windows I only have XP Pro SP3. Yes I know windows sucks in its own way as does any OS. Not to point any fingers. Everyone has a flavor of choice. I like the ability to modify kernels, modules, plugins, etc.. that windows limits a person on. I have done so but causes issues eventually in the way it is comprised. With that all said, what is best or where do the different BSD OS shine best in, I know I am asking allot is there a Linux OS that works well alongside BSD when networked together for server operations etc... I know it is a big question with a multitude a variability in the way it can be answered, or expressions and views given. I thank you in advance for any help or incite you can throw my way.
     
  2. hitest

    hitest Member

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    Welcome to the FreeBSD forums! :)
    I am quite biased; I would recommend FreeBSD 7.2, it is a very robust, stable, and fast version of BSD.
    However, FreeBSD does not have a graphical installer like Ubuntu. I recommend that you read the FreeBSD handbook before you install FreeBSD. A more user-friendly version of BSD is PC-BSD which is based on FreeBSD, and it has a good graphical installer.

    FreeBSD Handbook
     
  3. dennylin93

    dennylin93 New Member

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    There's a comparison of BSD OSes on Wikipedia: Comparison of BSD operating systems.

    OpenBSD: Very secure OS (at least that's what I've heard).
    NetBSD: Emphasis on portability and clean design.
    PC-BSD: Emphasis on ease of use for desktop/laptop users.

    FreeBSD is a great OS for many purposes. I've only installed OpenBSD once, gave up after installing it. Never tried the other BSDs.
     
  4. vivek

    vivek New Member

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    Define your usage i.e. do you wanna set web server, a firewall, desktop and so on...?
     
  5. axeexcess

    axeexcess New Member

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    Just use FreeBSD. You'll thank yourself in a few years.
     
  6. mjkerpan

    mjkerpan New Member

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    FreeBSD seems to be the best rounded of any of the BSDs. It combines a clean design (A friend of mine who studies such things says FreeBSD has the "best" code of any OS he's ever "read"), reasonable portability (x86, x86-64, SPARC 64 and PPC should cover just about all the "real" computers in the wild, while ARM should get most of the embedded market) and reasonably secure (when's the last time you heard of a FreeBSD-based server getting compromised). NetBSD sometimes seems so focused on being able to run on everything that it can lack features and speed on common platforms, while OpenBSD seems to be mainly by and for people who spend lots of time worrying about the possibility of SKYNET becoming self aware or something. PC-BSD isn't really a separate OS, but rather an alternate distribution of FreeBSD that gives a nice KDE-based desktop by default, but handles program installation differently by using Windows-style installers called PBIs instead of good old ports and packages.
     
  7. wonslung

    wonslung New Member

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    this made my night.
     
  8. toungewithgills

    toungewithgills New Member

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    The uses I had in mind (from Original Post)

    I had intended on building a firewall/router. I will also implementing the OS for a Apache Server, PHP Server, MYSQL Server, Mail Server, FTP Server, Asterisk Call Center. Later may employ a Media Server, Music Server, as well as dedicating towers to network monitoring, Web Design, Software Creation. This is my present configuration I have designed in my network sketches. I was looking at implementing BSD as the core of my network and running cross-platform integration of other OS later as the need if any shows itself. As I have said before I am very new to the OS Ubuntu is the only close OS somewhat using Unix I have interfaced with.
     
  9. Oko

    Oko Member

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    This thread looks like a troll and the above is a pile of FUD.
    Unless you have really hacked the kernel of all BSDs please refrain from statements like a "best code" and similar.
    You should do some reality checks or refrain from posting unless you know what you talking about.


    Couple real facts.

    1. FreeBSD is not portable quite on the contrary for all practical purposes runs only on i386 and amd64 hardware just
    like Linux.

    2. Despite common stereotypes actually OpenBSD is the most portable BSD on modern workstations as well as SUN and SGI made servers. OpenBSD supports the same sparc64 hardware as
    Solaris, the same PPC as Darwin, and the the same SGI hardware as Irix,

    3. If you want to run something esoteric like PDP-11 or Amiga your choice is only NetBSD.

    4. Actually NetBSD 5.0 runs really well on i386/amd64 and there
    are bench marks showing that scales far better than FreeBSD 7.XXX.

    5. NetBSD has all the features of FreeBSD and even more.It also
    makes a very fine desktop. It is also simpler OS than FreeBSD.

    6. If you need ZFC or DTrace obviously you choice is FreeBSD

    7. If you need virtualization so far the choice has been NetBSD.
    I hear that starting 8.0 the choice might be FreeBSD.

    8. DragonFly BSD is the only BSD which will soon have kernel support for clustering. So far runs only on i386 architecture however.

    9. It is true that FreeBSD is by far the most tolerant community towards clueless nobs. It is also true that FreeBSD has been and is still quite common entry point to BSD world for many new users at least on i386 platform. Couple years down the line people usually accumulate enough knowledge and migrate to
    the BSD flavor which fits the best their needs or to the one which
    they fancy the best or find the easiest to work with. (Actually in my bias point of view FreeBSD is the most complicated of all BSDs for work and the most Linux like in its philosophy).


    10. To original message posted by toungewithgills

    How do you expect to get an un-bias answer about BSDs when you
    came to FreeBSD forum. Obviously most people here do prefer FreeBSD over other flavors and that is the kind of answers you will get. All four major flavors of BSDs (DragonFly, Free, Net, and OpenBSD) have its very narrow sets of goals which they try to accomplish. All four communities are very friendly towards
    each other and usually the good code goes quickly from one flavor of BSD to another.

    The least common denominator for all BSDs that they make a fine desktop OS in the hands of the skilled system administrator.

    My suggestion is try all four and see what you like the best and than stick with it.
     
  10. Oko

    Oko Member

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    I assume that neither of you use OpenSSH and PF on your FreeBSD box when you can post such utterly ridiculous statements.
     
  11. Brandybuck

    Brandybuck New Member

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    The BSD wars, begun they have!
     
  12. wonslung

    wonslung New Member

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    i just thought it was funny, if you can't see the humor in it then you have a problem.
     
  13. DutchDaemon

    DutchDaemon Administrator Staff Member Administrator Moderator

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    Look over there, a bird!

    Facts and opinions noted. Suggest finding neutral platform for continued discussions.

    Closed.
     
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